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Technology Adoption In and Out of Major Urban Areas: When Do Internal Firm Resources Matter Most?

  • Chris Forman
  • Avi Goldfarb
  • Shane Greenstein

How much do internal firm resources contribute to technology adoption in major urban locations, where the advantages from agglomeration are greatest? The authors address this question in the context of a business's decision to adopt advanced Internet technology. Drawing on a rich data set of adoption decisions by 86,879 U.S. establishments, the authors find that the marginal contribution of internal resources to adoption is greater outside of a major urban area than inside one. Agglomeration is therefore less important for highly capable firms. The authors conclude that firms behave as if resources available in cities are substitutes for both establishment-level and firm-level internal resources.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w11642.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 11642.

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Date of creation: Sep 2005
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11642
Note: IO PR
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  1. Duranton, Gilles & Puga, Diego, 2000. "Nursery Cities: Urban Diversity, Process Innovation, and the Life-Cycle of Products," CEPR Discussion Papers 2376, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Thomas J. Holmes, 1995. "Localization of industry and vertical disintegration," Staff Report 190, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  3. Chris Forman & Avi Goldfarb & Shane Greenstein, 2002. "Digital Dispersion: An Industrial and Geographic Census of Commerical Internet Use," NBER Working Papers 9287, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Karshenas, Massoud & Stoneman, Paul, 1990. "Rank, Stock, Order And Epidemic Effects In The Diffusion Of New Process Technologies : An Empirical Model," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 358, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  5. Thomas J. Holmes & John J. Stevens, 2002. "Geographic Concentration and Establishment Scale," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(4), pages 682-690, November.
  6. Austan Goolsbee & Peter J. Klenow, 1999. "Evidence on Learning and Network Externalities in the Diffusion of Home Computers," NBER Working Papers 7329, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Rajiv D. Banker & Sandra A. Slaughter, 1997. "A Field Study of Scale Economies in Software Maintenance," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(12), pages 1709-1725, December.
  8. Colombo, Massimo G & Mosconi, Rocco, 1995. "Complementarity and Cumulative Learning Effects in the Early Diffusion of Multiple Technologies," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 13-48, March.
  9. Maryellen Kelley & Susan Helper, 1999. "Firm Size And Capabilities, Regional Agglomeration, And The Adoption Of New Technology," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1-2), pages 79-103.
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