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Energy and Growth under Flexible Exchange Rates: A Simulation Study

  • Jeffrey D. Sachs
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    This paper offers a theoretical framework for studying the inter-actions of energy prices and economic growth. The incorporation of energy prices and quantities in a macroeconomic setting focuses on (1)the aggregate technology; (2) the interdependence of energy producers and consumers in the world economy; and (3) the asset markets as the channel through which energy price changes affect output and capital accumulation. While several existing studies consider aspects of these issues, none provides a synthesis. In this analysis, a theoretically sound model of an oil price increase in the world economy is presented, carefully treating topics (1) - (3).The model is solved with computer simulation, as it is far too complex to yield analytical solutions.

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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 0582.

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    Date of creation: Nov 1980
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    Publication status: published as Sachs, Jeffrey. "Energy and Growth under Flexible Exchange Rates: A Simulation Study." Economic Interdependence and Flexible Exchange Rates, edited by J. S. Bhandari and B. H. Putnam, pp. 191-220. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1983.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:0582
    Note: ITI IFM EEE
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    1. Griffin, James M & Gregory, Paul R, 1976. "An Intercountry Translog Model of Energy Substitution Responses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(5), pages 845-57, December.
    2. Brock, William A, 1974. "Money and Growth: The Case of Long Run Perfect Foresight," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 15(3), pages 750-77, October.
    3. David Lipton & James M. Poterba & Jeffrey Sachs & Lawrence H. Summers, 1983. "Multiple Shooting in Rational Expectations Models," NBER Technical Working Papers 0003, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Berndt, Ernst R & Wood, David O, 1979. "Engineering and Econometric Interpretations of Energy-Capital Complementarity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 342-54, June.
    5. Michael Bruno & Jeffrey Sachs, 1979. "Macro-Economic Adjustment With Import Price Shocks: Real and Monetary Aspects," NBER Working Papers 0340, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ronald E. Findlay & Carlos Alfredo Rodriguez, 1977. "Intermediate Imports and Macroeconomic Policy under Flexible Exchange Rates," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 10(2), pages 208-17, May.
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