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Impact of information cost and switching of trading strategies in an artificial stock market

Author

Listed:
  • Yi-Fang Liu

    (College of Management and Economics, China Center for Social Computing and Analytics and Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne)

  • Wei Zhang

    (College of Management and Economics, China Center for Social Computing and Analytics)

  • Chao Xu

    (College of Management and Economics, China Center for Social Computing and Analytics)

  • Jørgen Vitting Andersen

    (Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne)

  • Hai-Chuan Xu

    (College of Management and Economics, China Center for Social Computing and Analytics)

Abstract

This paper studies the switching of trading strategies and its effect on the market volatility in a continuous double auction market. We describe the behavior when some uninformed agents, who we call switchers, decide whether or not to pay for information before they trade. By paying for the information they behave as informed traders. First, we verify that our model is able to reproduce some of the stylized facts in real financial markets. Next we consider the relationship between switching and the market volatility under different structures of investors. We find that there exists a positive relationship between the market volatility and the percentage of switchers. We therefore conclude that the switchers are a destabilizing factor in the market. However, for a given fixed percentage of switchers, the proportion of switchers that decide to buy information at a given moment of time is negatively related to the current market volatility. In other words, if more agents pay for information to know the fundamental value at some time, the market volatility will be lower. This is because the market price is closer to the fundamental value due to information diffusion between switchers

Suggested Citation

  • Yi-Fang Liu & Wei Zhang & Chao Xu & Jørgen Vitting Andersen & Hai-Chuan Xu, 2014. "Impact of information cost and switching of trading strategies in an artificial stock market," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 14031, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:14031
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Basaure, Arturo & Suomi, Henna & Hämmäinen, Heikki, 2014. "Effects of transaction and switching costs on mobile market performance," 20th ITS Biennial Conference, Rio de Janeiro 2014: The Net and the Internet - Emerging Markets and Policies 106830, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
    3. Roberto Mota Navarro & Hernán Larralde, 2017. "A detailed heterogeneous agent model for a single asset financial market with trading via an order book," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 12(2), pages 1-27, February.
    4. Kyubin Yim & Gabjin Oh & Seunghwan Kim, 2016. "Understanding Financial Market States Using an Artificial Double Auction Market," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(3), pages 1-15, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agent-based model; heterogeneity; switching behavior; market volatility;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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