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Are U.K. Stock Prices Excessively Volatile? Trading Rules and Variance Bounds Tests

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  • Bulkley, George
  • Tonks, Ian

Abstract

The authors apply the original variance bounds tests to the present value model for the U.K. stock market and amend these tests to take account of revisions in the model's parameters. They show that variance bounds tests that correct for this are no longer violated. However, they claim there is excess volatility if agents, restricted to using only current information to compute a trading rule, could make excess profits. They show that a trading rule exists which yields, in the long run, more than twice the wealth from buying than holding a representative market portfolio. Copyright 1989 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Bulkley, George & Tonks, Ian, 1989. "Are U.K. Stock Prices Excessively Volatile? Trading Rules and Variance Bounds Tests," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(398), pages 1083-1098, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:99:y:1989:i:398:p:1083-98
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    Cited by:

    1. Diks, Cees & Dindo, Pietro, 2008. "Informational differences and learning in an asset market with boundedly rational agents," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1432-1465, May.
    2. Shiller, Robert J. & Beltratti, Andrea E., 1992. "Stock prices and bond yields : Can their comovements be explained in terms of present value models?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 25-46, October.
    3. Ian Tonks & Andy Snell & George Bulkley, 1996. "Excessive Dispersion of US Stock Prices: A Regression Test of Cross-Sectional Volatility," FMG Discussion Papers dp246, Financial Markets Group.
    4. J. Bradford De Long & Richard Grossman, 1992. "Excess Volatility on the London Stock Market, 1870-1990," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _133, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
    5. Yi-Fang Liu & Wei Zhang & Chao Xu & Jørgen Vitting Andersen & Hai-Chuan Xu, 2014. "Impact of information cost and switching of trading strategies in an artificial stock market," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01011701, HAL.
    6. Rambaccussing, Dooruj, 2015. "Revisiting Shiller's excess volatility hypothesis," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-33, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    7. Dooruj Rambaccussing, 2015. "Revisiting Shiller’s excess volatility hypothesis," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 287, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
    8. Yi-Fang Liu & Wei Zhang & Chao Xu & Jørgen Vitting Andersen & Hai-Chuan Xu, 2014. "Impact of information cost and switching of trading strategies in an artificial stock market," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00983051, HAL.
    9. Rambaccussing, Dooruj, 2015. "Revisiting Shiller’s excess volatility hypothesis," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-82, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    10. Lund, Jesper & Engsted, Tom, 1996. "GMM and present value tests of the C-CAPM: evidence from the Danish, German, Swedish and UK stock markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 497-521, August.
    11. Sandrine Jacob Leal, 2015. "Fundamentalists, chartists and asset pricing anomalies," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(11), pages 1837-1850, November.
    12. Yi-Fang Liu & Wei Zhang & Chao Xu & Jørgen Vitting Andersen & Hai-Chuan Xu, 2014. "Impact of information cost and switching of trading strategies in an artificial stock market," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01215947, HAL.
    13. Dooruj Rambaccussing, 2011. "Do Mean Reverting based trading strategies outperform Buy and Hold?," Working Papers 1113, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
    14. Cuthbertson, Keith & Hayes, Simon & Nitzsche, Dirk, 1999. "Explaining movements in UK stock prices," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 1-19.
    15. Crafts, N.F.R. & Mills, T.C., 1990. "British Economic Fluctuations, 1851-1913: A Perspective Based On Growth Theory," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 362, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    16. Rambaccussing, Dooruj, 2009. "Exploiting price misalignements," MPRA Paper 27147, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Yi-Fang Liu & Wei Zhang & Chao Xu & J{o}rgen Vitting Andersen & Hai-Chuan Xu, 2013. "Impact of information cost and switching of trading strategies in an artificial stock market," Papers 1311.4274, arXiv.org, revised Jul 2014.
    18. Eugene N. White & Peter Rappoport, 1994. "The New York Stock Market in the 1920s and 1930s: Did Stock Prices Move Together Too Much?," NBER Working Papers 4627, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Bulkley, George & Taylor, Nick, 1996. "A cross-section test of the present value model," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 295-306, February.
    20. Yi-Fang Liu & Wei Zhang & Chao Xu & Jørgen Vitting Andersen & Hai-Chuan Xu, 2014. "Impact of information cost and switching of trading strategies in an artificial stock market," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 14031, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.

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