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Technological Change and ICTs in OECD Countries

  • M. Gulenay Ongan Baskaya

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Brown University)

  • Erkan Erdil

    ()

    (STP Research Center, METU)

The motivation of the study is to form a ground for further research on the issue of the effect of electronic commerce on economic variables that has been supported by empirical models. In this respect, a considerable part of the study is devoted to the discussion of the building significant relationship between technology, electronic commerce and the fundamentals of the real economy. As a result of both the conceptual part and the analytical part, two important conclusions were drawn. The first one is that technological change is increasingly gaining special emphasis especially with the rising arguments on the issue of "New Economy". The second important point is that technological change and electronic commerce are in relation with the most important variables of the real economy like gross domestic product, investment, trade balance and also R&D expenditures.

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File URL: http://www.stps.metu.edu.tr/sites/stps.metu.edu.tr/files/0301.pdf
File Function: First version, 2003
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by STPS - Science and Technology Policy Studies Center, Middle East Technical University in its series STPS Working Papers with number 0301.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2003
Date of revision: Jan 2003
Handle: RePEc:met:stpswp:0301
Contact details of provider: Postal: Ankara 06531
Phone: +90 (312) 210 2003
Fax: (312) 210 1244
Web page: http://www.stps.metu.edu.tr
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  1. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
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  15. Alessandra Colecchia & George Papaconstantinou, 1996. "The Evolution of Skills in OECD Countries and the Role of Technology," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 1996/8, OECD Publishing.
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