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The Making of a Latin American Global Economist

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  • David Colander
  • Hugo Nopo Key Words: Latin American economics, global economics, political economy, graduate training, Latin America, applied economics

Abstract

This paper provides some background for considering the future of these two traditions by looking at global Latin American graduate economic programs. It reports the findings of a survey of Latin American global economics programs and discusses the debate between global economics and traditional economics, arguing that there is a role for both, with global economics concentrating on the science of economics, and traditional economics concentrating on the applied policy "political economy" branch of economics--which is much broader than the applied policy training that graduate students get in global economics.

Suggested Citation

  • David Colander & Hugo Nopo Key Words: Latin American economics, global economics, political economy, graduate training, Latin America, applied economics, 2007. "The Making of a Latin American Global Economist," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0705, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mdl:mdlpap:0705
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Colander, 2007. "What Was “It” that Robbins Was Defining?," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0706, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    2. David Colander, 2005. "The Making of an Economist Redux," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 175-198, Winter.
    3. David Colander, 2008. "The Making of a Global European Economist," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 215-236, May.
    4. Colander, David & Klamer, Arjo, 1987. "The Making of an Economist," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 95-111, Fall.
    5. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 157-176, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sergio M. Focardi & Frank J. Fabozzi, 2010. "The Reasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Economics," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 55(1), pages 19-30, May.
    2. Arne Heise, 2014. "The Future of Economics in a Lakatos–Bourdieu Framework," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 70-93, July.
    3. Roger Backhouse & Matthias Klaes, 2009. "Applying economics, using evidence," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 139-144.
    4. J. E. King, 2012. "Post Keynesians and Others," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 305-319, April.
    5. Eduardo Lora & Hugo Ñopo, 2009. "La Formación de los Economistas en America Latina," Revista de Analisis Economico – Economic Analysis Review, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Business, vol. 24(2), pages 65-93, Diciembre.
    6. Etienne Lepers, 2018. "The Neutrality Illusion: Biased Economics, Biased Training, and Biased Monetary Policy. Testing the Role of Ideology on FOMC Voting Behaviour," New Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 105-127, January.
    7. Hendrik P. van Dalen & Kène Henkens, 2012. "What is on a Demographer’s Mind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(16), pages 363-408.
    8. Javier Gómez Pineda, 2008. "El crecimiento económico y la supervivencia: el caso de las matemáticas y la economía"," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 004579, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    9. Daniel W. Bromley, 2008. "Epistemic Flagpoles: Economics Journals as Instrumental Rhetoric," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 52(2), pages 33-41, October.
    10. David Colander, 2009. "Can European Economics Compete with U.S. Economics? And Should It"," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0902, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    11. Correa Mautz, Feipe, 2017. "La economía como argumento político: evidencia de estudiantes de economía en Chile," Documentos de Trabajo 4, Estudios Nueva Economía.
    12. Groß Steffen W., 2010. "Warum sich Ökonomen (wieder) mit Philosophie beschäftigen sollten – und Philosophen (wieder) mit Ökonomie / Why Economists should be more interested in Philosophy (again) – and why Philosophers should," ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, De Gruyter, vol. 61(1), pages 75-94, January.
    13. G. M. Peter Swann, 2016. "The econocracy: the perils of leaving economics to the experts," Prometheus, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3-4), pages 231-249, October.
    14. Alex Millmow, 2010. "The Changing Sociology of the Australian Academic Economics Profession," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 29(1), pages 87-95, March.
    15. Yefimov, Vladumir, 2011. "Дискурсивный Анализ В Экономике: Пересмотр Методологии И Истории Экономической Науки. Часть 2 - Иная История И Современность [Discourse analysis in economics: methodology and history of economics r," MPRA Paper 49069, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Arthur Diamond, 2009. "Fixing ideas: how research is constrained by mandated formalism," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 191-206.
    17. Bruce K. Johnson & John J. Perry & Marie Petkus, 2012. "The Status of Econometrics in the Economics Major: A Survey," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 315-324, July.

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