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Educating Latin American economists

Author

Listed:
  • David Colander

    () (Middlebury College)

  • Hugo Ñopo

    () (Inter-American Development Bank)

Abstract

Graduate economic programmes in Latin America have evolved along the lines of two different traditions: one closely linked to the current economic mainstream (being in that sense ‘global’) and the other more local and heterodox. This paper provides an overview of perceptions, interests, concerns and opinions of global Latin American graduate economic programmes, comparing them with similar programmes in Europe and the US. It reports the findings of a survey of Latin American global economics programmes and discusses the debate between global economics and traditional economics, arguing that there is a role for both, with global economics concentrating on the science of economics and traditional economics concentrating on the applied policy ‘political economy’ branch of economics – which is much broader than the applied policy training that graduate students get in global economics.

Suggested Citation

  • David Colander & Hugo Ñopo, 2011. "Educating Latin American economists," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 10(1), pages 54-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:10:y:2011:i:1:p:54-69
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    File URL: http://economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/v10n1/colander_nopo.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Colander, David, 2009. "What Was “It” That Robbins Was Defining?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, pages 437-448.
    2. David Colander, 2008. "The Making of a Global European Economist," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 215-236, May.
    3. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, pages 157-176.
    4. David Colander, 2010. "The Evolution of U.S.Economics Textbooks," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 1037, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Correa, Felipe, 2016. "El pensamiento económico en los estudiantes de economía de Chile," El Trimestre Económico, Fondo de Cultura Económica, vol. 0(330), pages .405-427, abril-jun.

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