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Value Orientations, Income and Displacement Effects, and Voluntary Contributions

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  • Neil Buckley
  • Kenneth S. Chan
  • James Chowhan
  • Stuart Mestelman
  • Mohamed Shehata

Abstract

Identifying the value orientations of subjects participating in market or non-market decisions by having them participate in decomposed games may be helpful in understanding the behaviour of these subjects. This experiment presents the results of changes in the centre and the radius of a value orientations ring in an attempt to discover if the value orientations resulting from a ring game exhibit income or displacement effects. Two sets of subjects, 113 from the first and 96 from the second participated in the first two treatments and 72 from the second set of subjects participated in the third and fourth treatments. While the resulting distributions of value orientations are significantly different across the two sets of subjects when the treatments are common, neither significant income effects nor displacement effects are identified. However, an external validity check with a voluntary contribution game provides evidence of a displacement effect. Value orientations from rings centred around the origin of the decision-space explain significant portions of voluntary contributions while value orientations from displaced rings do not.

Suggested Citation

  • Neil Buckley & Kenneth S. Chan & James Chowhan & Stuart Mestelman & Mohamed Shehata, 2000. "Value Orientations, Income and Displacement Effects, and Voluntary Contributions," Department of Economics Working Papers 2000-03, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:deptwp:2000-03
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    File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/econ/rsrch/papers/archive/2000-03.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Buckley, Neil & Mestelman, Stuart & Shehata, Mohamed, 2003. "Subsidizing public inputs," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3-4), pages 819-846, March.
    2. Offerman, Theo & Sonnemans, Joep & Schram, Arthur, 1996. "Value Orientations, Expectations and Voluntary Contributions in Public Goods," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(437), pages 817-845, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rene Bekkers, 2007. "Measuring altruistic behavior in surveys: The all-or-nothing dictator game," Artefactual Field Experiments 00102, The Field Experiments Website.
    2. Jeremiah Hurley & Emmanouil Mentzakis, 2011. "Existence and Magnitude of Health-related Externalities: Evidence from a Choice Experiment," Department of Economics Working Papers 2011-01, McMaster University.
    3. Mentzakis, Emmanouil & Mestelman, Stuart, 2013. "Hypothetical bias in value orientations ring games," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(3), pages 562-565.
    4. Chan, Kenneth S. & Godby, Rob & Mestelman, Stuart & Andrew Muller, R., 2002. "Crowding-out voluntary contributions to public goods," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 305-317, July.
    5. Brunton, Douglas & Hasan, Rabia & Mestelman, Stuart, 2001. "The 'spite' dilemma: spite or no spite, is there a dilemma?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 405-412, June.
    6. Johannes Abeler & Daniele Nosenzo, 2013. "Self-selection into Economics Experiments is Driven by Monetary Rewards," Discussion Papers 2013-03, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    7. John Spraggon, 2002. "Individual Decision Making in Exogenous Targeting Instrument Experiments," McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory Publications 2002-01, McMaster University.
    8. Kiridaran Kanagaretnam & Stuart Mestelman & Khalid Nainar & Mohamed Shehata, 2006. "Trust, Reciprocity and the Roles of Sex, Value Orientation and Risk Attitudes in an Investment Game," Department of Economics Working Papers 2006-04, McMaster University.
    9. Jeffrey P. Carpenter, 2005. "Endogenous Social Preferences," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 37(1), pages 63-84, March.
    10. Kanagaretnam, Kiridaran & Mestelman, Stuart & Nainar, Khalid & Shehata, Mohamed, 2009. "The impact of social value orientation and risk attitudes on trust and reciprocity," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 368-380, June.
    11. Hurley, Jeremiah & Mentzakis, Emmanouil, 2013. "Health-related externalities: Evidence from a choice experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 671-681.
    12. Aleksandra Gajic & David Cameron & Jeremiah Hurley, 2012. "The cost-effectiveness of cash versus lottery incentives for a web-based, stated-preference community survey," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 789-799, December.
    13. John Smith, 2012. "The endogenous nature of the measurement of social preferences," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 11(2), pages 235-256, December.
    14. Mohamed I. Gomaa & Stuart Mestelman & Mohamed Shehata, 2014. "Social Distance, Reputation, Risk Attitude, Value Orientation and Equity in Economic Exchanges," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-07, McMaster University.
    15. Stuart Mestelman, 2000. "Environmental Policy: Lessons from the Laboratory," McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory Publications 2000-01, McMaster University.

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