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Poverty Targeting and Impact of a Governmental Micro-credit Program in Vietnam


  • Nguyen Viet Cuong
  • Minh Thu Pham
  • Nguyet Pham Minh
  • Vu Thieu
  • Duong Toan


It is argued that without collateral the poor often face binding borrowing constraints in the formal credit market. This justifies a micro-credit program, which is operated by the Vietnam Bank for Social Policies to provide the poor with preferential credit. This paper examines poverty targeting and impact of the micro-credit program. It is found that the program is not very pro-poor in terms of targeting. Among the participants, the non-poor account for a larger proportion of loans. The non-poor also tend to receive larger amounts of credit compared to the poor. However, the program has positive impact on poverty reduction of the participants. This positive impact is found for all the three Foster-Greer-Thorbecke poverty measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Nguyen Viet Cuong & Minh Thu Pham & Nguyet Pham Minh & Vu Thieu & Duong Toan, 2007. "Poverty Targeting and Impact of a Governmental Micro-credit Program in Vietnam," Working Papers PMMA 2007-29, PEP-PMMA.
  • Handle: RePEc:lvl:pmmacr:2007-29

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Xia & Gan, Christopher & Hu, Baiding, 2011. "The welfare impact of microcredit on rural households in China," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 404-411, August.

    More about this item


    Micro-credit; poverty; poverty targeting; impact evaluation; instrumental variables; fixed-effect model;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • H81 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Governmental Loans; Loan Guarantees; Credits; Grants; Bailouts


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