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Is the 'Shop Around the Corner' a Luxury or a Nuisance? The relationship between income and neighborhood retail patterns

Author

Listed:
  • Jenny Schuetz
  • Jed Kolko
  • Rachel Meltzer

Abstract

Affluent neighborhoods present a potentially attractive location for retail establishments because of their higher purchasing power and demand for a wide range of specialized goods and services. However, if high income households perceive retail in general – or certain types of retail, such as Big Box stores – as an undesirable use, they may be able to block commercial development through zoning and the political process. In thispaper we shed light on these issues by examining the relationship betweenneighborhood income and several different types of retail presence for 58 large U.S metropolitan areas. We combine detailed data from the National Establishment TimeSeries database on retail establishments and employment, by industry category and firm type, with Census data on ZCTA income and demographics. Results indicate that retail density varies with income for certain retail types, such as food service and chain supermarkets and drugstores. In addition, average establishment size increases with income for all retail types. Retail density increases with population density, as expected, and decreases with distance to CBD and with share of owner-occupied housing.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenny Schuetz & Jed Kolko & Rachel Meltzer, 2010. "Is the 'Shop Around the Corner' a Luxury or a Nuisance? The relationship between income and neighborhood retail patterns," Working Paper 8513, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
  • Handle: RePEc:luk:wpaper:8513
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    File URL: http://lusk.usc.edu/sites/default/files/working_papers/wp_2010_1005.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Davis, 2006. "Spatial competition in retail markets: movie theaters," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 37(4), pages 964-982, December.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser, Jed Kolko, and Albert Saiz, 2001. "Consumer city," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 27-50, January.
    3. Emek Basker & Shawn Klimek & Pham Hoang Van, 2008. "Supersize It: The Growth of Retail Chains and the Rise of the "Big Box" Retail Format," Working Papers 0809, Department of Economics, University of Missouri, revised 30 Sep 2010.
    4. Haltiwanger, John & Jarmin, Ron & Krizan, C.J., 2010. "Mom-and-Pop meet Big-Box: Complements or substitutes?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 116-134, January.
    5. Jerry Hausman & Ephraim Leibtag, 2007. "Consumer benefits from increased competition in shopping outlets: Measuring the effect of Wal-Mart," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(7), pages 1157-1177.
    6. repec:rje:randje:v:37:y:2006:i:4:p:964-982 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Rachel Meltzer & Jenny Schuetz, 2010. "Bodegas or Bagel Shops? Neighborhood Differences in Retail & Household Services," Working Paper 33, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    8. McKinnish, Terra & Walsh, Randall & Kirk White, T., 2010. "Who gentrifies low-income neighborhoods?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 180-193, March.
    9. de Palma, Andre & Lindsey, Robin & von Hohenbalken, Balder & West, Douglas S., 1994. "Spatial price and variety competition in an urban retail market : A nested logit analysis," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 331-357, September.
    10. Waldfogel, Joel, 2008. "The median voter and the median consumer: Local private goods and population composition," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 567-582, March.
    11. Emin M. Dinlersoz, 2004. "Firm Organization and the Structure of Retail Markets," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(2), pages 207-240, June.
    12. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1992. "Gross Job Creation, Gross Job Destruction, and Employment Reallocation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 819-863.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rachel Meltzer & Jenny Schuetz, 2010. "Bodegas or Bagel Shops? Neighborhood Differences in Retail & Household Services," Working Paper 33, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.

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