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Household-level Credit Constraints in Urban Ethiopia

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  • Gamal Ibrahim

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  • Abbi Kedir
  • Sebastian Torres

Abstract

Empirical evidence on determinants of credit constraints and the amount borrowed by urban household in Sub-Saharan Africa is almost non-existent. Using an extended direct approach by virtue of the unique data set we have (the Fourth Round Ethiopian Urban Household Survey), we analysed the determinants of credit constraints and the amount borrowed by urban households. We find a high percentage of credit-constrained households, the majority of which constitute discouraged borrowers. Discrete choice models that control for potential endogeneity and selectivity bias have been fitted to our data. Our analysis shows current household resources, number of dependants, and location as significant correlates.

Suggested Citation

  • Gamal Ibrahim & Abbi Kedir & Sebastian Torres, 2007. "Household-level Credit Constraints in Urban Ethiopia," Discussion Papers in Economics 07/03, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:07/3
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Pieroni, Luca & Scarlato, Margherita, 2013. "Social Protection and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Evaluation of Cash Transfer Programmes," MPRA Paper 49536, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Isaac Koomson & Samuel Kobina Annim & James Atta Peprah, 2016. "Loan refusal, household income and savings in Ghana: a dominance analysis approach," African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 172-191.
    3. María Noelia Garbero, 2012. "Un análisis de los efectos de las restricciones de liquidez en la acumulación de capital humano: Evidencia para Nicaragua," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0136, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    4. Ana María Iregui-Bohórquez & Ligia Alba Melo-Becerra & María Teresa Ramírez-Giraldo & Ana María Tribín-Uribe, 2016. "Determinantes del acceso al crédito formal e informal: Evidencia de los hogares de ingresos medios y bajos en Colombia," Borradores de Economia 956, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    5. Abate, Gashaw Tadesse & Rashid, Shahidur & Borzaga, Carlos & Getnet, Kindie, 2015. "Rural finance and agricultural technology adoption in Ethiopia: Does institutional design matter?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1422, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Abbi Kedir & Gamal Ibrahim, 2011. "ROSCAs in Urban Ethiopia: Are the Characteristics of the Institutions More Important than those of Members?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(7), pages 998-1016.
    7. repec:cml:incocp:7en-05 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Koomson, Isaac & Annim, Samuel Kobina & Peprah, James Atta, 2014. "Loan Refusal, Household Income and Savings in Ghana," MPRA Paper 58049, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Olomola, Aderbigbe & Gyimah-Brempong, Kwabena, 2014. "Loan demand and rationing among small-scale farmers in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1403, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Burchi, Francesco & Scarlato, Margherita & D'Agostino, Giorgio, 2016. "Addressing food insecurity in sub-Saharan Africa: the role of cash transfers," Discussion Papers 17/2016, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    11. Luis Alberto Merchán Benavides, 2018. "¿Afecta la distancia de residencia a los centros urbanos la calidad en la cartera de creditos? Caso aplicado a una entidad financiera de Colombia," Vniversitas Económica 016451, Universidad Javeriana - Bogotá.
    12. repec:cml:incocp:7sp-05 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Ayalew Ali, Daniel & Deininger, Klaus, 2012. "Causes and implications of credit rationing in rural Ethiopia : the importance of spatial variation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6096, The World Bank.
    14. María Noelia Garbero, 2012. "Efectos de las restricciones de liquidez en la acumulación de capital humano: evidencia para Nicaragua," Económica, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, vol. 0, pages 53-95, January-D.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    credit constrained households; credit rationing; endogeneity; instrumental variables; urban Ethiopia; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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