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Direct Elicitation of Credit Constraints: Conceptual and Practical Issues with an Application to Peruvian Agriculture

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  • Stephen R. Boucher
  • Catherine Guirkinger
  • Carolina Trivelli

Abstract

This article provides a methodological bridge leading from the well-developed theory of credit rationing to the less developed territory of empirically identifying credit constraints. We begin by developing a simple model showing that credit constraints may take three forms: quantity rationing, transaction cost rationing, and risk rationing. Each form adversely affects household resource allocation and thus should be accounted for in empirical analyses of credit market performance. We outline a survey strategy to directly elicit households' status as unconstrained or constrained in the credit market and, if constrained, to further identify which of the three nonprice rationing mechanisms is at play. We discuss several practical issues that arise due to the use of a combination of "factual" and "interpretative" survey questions. Finally, using a farm-level data set from Peru, we illustrate how the methodology can be used to estimate the impacts of credit constraints. (c) 2009 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

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  • Stephen R. Boucher & Catherine Guirkinger & Carolina Trivelli, 2009. "Direct Elicitation of Credit Constraints: Conceptual and Practical Issues with an Application to Peruvian Agriculture," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(4), pages 609-640, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:57:y:2009:i:4:p:609-640
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Petrick, 2004. "A microeconometric analysis of credit rationing in the Polish farm sector," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 77-101, March.
    2. Boucher, Stephen R. & Carter, Michael R. & Guirkinger, Catherine, 2008. "AJAE Appendix: Risk Rationing and Wealth Effects in Credit Markets: Theory and Implications for Agriculture Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics Appendices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(2), May.
    3. Zimmerman, Frederick J. & Carter, Michael R., 2003. "Asset smoothing, consumption smoothing and the reproduction of inequality under risk and subsistence constraints," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 233-260, August.
    4. Stephen R. Boucher & Michael R. Carter & Catherine Guirkinger, 2008. "Risk Rationing and Wealth Effects in Credit Markets: Theory and Implications for Agricultural Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(2), pages 409-423.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ali, Daniel Ayalew & Deininger, Klaus & Duponchel, Marguerite, 2014. "Credit constraints, agricultural productivity, and rural nonfarm participation : evidence from Rwanda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6769, The World Bank.
    2. Malapit, Hazel J. & Pinkstaff, Crossley & Sproule, Kathryn & Kovarik, Chiara & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela, 2017. "The Abbreviated Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (A-WEAI):," IFPRI discussion papers 1647, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Dufhues, Thomas & Buchenrieder, Gertrud & Munkung, Nuchanata, 2012. "Individual social capital and access to formal credit in Thailand," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 123401, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Li, Changsheng & Lin, Liqiong & Gan, Christopher E.C., 2016. "China credit constraints and rural households’ consumption expenditure," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 158-164.
    5. Shahidur R. Khandker & Gayatri B. Koolwal, 2016. "How has microcredit supported agriculture? Evidence using panel data from Bangladesh," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 47(2), pages 157-168, March.
    6. Morvant-Roux, Solène & Guérin, Isabelle & Roesch, Marc & Moisseron, Jean-Yves, 2014. "Adding Value to Randomization with Qualitative Analysis: The Case of Microcredit in Rural Morocco," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 302-312.
    7. Shoji, Masahiro, 2017. "Eliciting Guilt Sensitivity to Predict Real-World Behavior," MPRA Paper 81451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Ambler, Kate & Doss, Cheryl & Kieran, Caitlin & Passarelli, Simone, 2017. "He says, she says: Exploring patterns of spousal agreement in Bangladesh," IFPRI discussion papers 1616, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Olomola, Aderbigbe, 2014. "Business operations of agrodealers and their participation in the loan market in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1400, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Mohammed Ziaul Hoque & Nilufar Sultana & Tasmia Thalil, 2016. "Credit rationing’s determinants of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Chittagong, Bangladesh," Journal of Global Entrepreneurship Research, Springer;UNESCO Chair in Entrepreneurship, vol. 6(1), pages 1-23, December.
    11. Petrick, Martin & Kloss, Mathias, 2012. "Drivers of agricultural capital productivity in selected EU member states," Working Papers 132838, Factor Markets, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    12. Reyes, Alvaro & Lensink, Robert & Kuyvenhoven, Arie & Moll, Henk, 2012. "Impact of Access to Credit on Farm Productivity of Fruit and Vegetable Growers in Chile," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126217, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    13. Shoji, Masahiro & Aoyagi, Keitaro & Kasahara, Ryuji & Sawada, Yasuyuki & Ueyama, Mika, 2012. "Social Capital Formation and Credit Access: Evidence from Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2522-2536.
    14. Olomola, Aderbigbe & Gyimah-Brempong, Kwabena, 2014. "Loan demand and rationing among small-scale farmers in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1403, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Reyes, Alvaro & Lensink, Robert & Kuyvenhoven, Arie & Moll, Henk, 2012. "Dynamics of Investment for Market-Oriented Farmers in Chile," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126218, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    16. Diana Fletschner & Catherine Guirkinger & Steve Boucher, 2010. "Risk, Credit Constraints and Financial Efficiency in Peruvian Agriculture," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(6), pages 981-1002.

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