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Impact of Access to Credit on Farm Productivity of Fruit and Vegetable Growers in Chile

  • Reyes, Alvaro
  • Lensink, Robert
  • Kuyvenhoven, Arie
  • Moll, Henk

The objective of this paper is to analyze the factors that determine productivity of fruit and vegetable growers in central Chile, focusing especially on the effect of short-term credit on farm productivity for market-oriented farmers. We explicitly test for possible selection bias using a panel data set from a survey conducted in 2006 and 2008 with 177 farmers. Our results indicate that short-term credit does not have an impact on farm productivity, while other factors as education and the type of activity do. These results suggest that other providers of credit, such as informal credit institutions, may relax short-term credit constraints in rural financial markets in Chile.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126217
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Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil with number 126217.

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Date of creation: Aug 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126217
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  1. Michael R. Carter & Pedro Olinto, 2003. "Getting Institutions “Right” for Whom? Credit Constraints and the Impact of Property Rights on the Quantity and Composition of Investment," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 173-186.
  2. Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia & Skrondal, Anders & Pickles, Andrew, 2005. "Maximum likelihood estimation of limited and discrete dependent variable models with nested random effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 128(2), pages 301-323, October.
  3. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  4. Carter, Michael R., 1989. "The impact of credit on peasant productivity and differentiation in Nicaragua," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 13-36, July.
  5. Feder, Gershon & Lau, Lawrence J. & Lin, Justin Y. & Xiaopeng, Luo, 1989. "Agricultural credit and farm performance in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 508-526, December.
  6. Ekaterini Kyriazidou, 1997. "Estimation of a Panel Data Sample Selection Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(6), pages 1335-1364, November.
  7. Martin Petrick, 2004. "A microeconometric analysis of credit rationing in the Polish farm sector," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 77-101, March.
  8. Stephen R. Boucher & Catherine Guirkinger & Carolina Trivelli, 2009. "Direct Elicitation of Credit Constraints: Conceptual and Practical Issues with an Application to Peruvian Agriculture," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(4), pages 609-640, 07.
  9. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  10. Diana Fletschner & Catherine Guirkinger & Steve Boucher, 2010. "Risk, Credit Constraints and Financial Efficiency in Peruvian Agriculture," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(6), pages 981-1002.
  11. Guirkinger, Catherine & Boucher, Stephen R., 2007. "Credit Constraints and Productivity in Peruvian Agriculture," Working Papers 6882, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  12. Petrick, Martin, 2004. "Farm investment, credit rationing, and governmentally promoted credit access in Poland: a cross-sectional analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 275-294, June.
  13. Francisco Gallego & Norman Loayza, 2000. "Financial Structure in Chile: Macroeconomic Developments and Microeconomic Effects," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 75, Central Bank of Chile.
  14. Foltz, Jeremy D., 2004. "Credit market access and profitability in Tunisian agriculture," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 229-240, May.
  15. Kochar, Anjini, 1997. "An empirical investigation of rationing constraints in rural credit markets in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 339-371, August.
  16. William FOSTER & William FOSTER, 2006. "Chilean Agriculture And Major Economic Reforms: Growth, Trade, Poverty And The Environment," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 23, pages 187-214.
  17. Guirkinger, Catherine, 2008. "Understanding the Coexistence of Formal and Informal Credit Markets in Piura, Peru," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1436-1452, August.
  18. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 1995. "Selection corrections for panel data models under conditional mean independence assumptions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 115-132, July.
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