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Understanding the Coexistence of Formal and Informal Credit Markets in Piura, Peru

  • Guirkinger, Catherine

Summary This paper examines why farm households seek informal loans in Piura, Peru, where formal lenders offer loans at lower interest rates. A panel data econometric analysis reveals that the informal sector serves various types of clients: households excluded from the formal sector but also households that prefer informal loans because of lower transaction costs or lower risk. An in-depth examination of contract terms and loan technologies permits an accurate comparison of effective loan costs and contractual risk across sectors and reveals that proximity and economies of scope enjoyed by informal lenders enable them to substitute information-intensive screening and monitoring for contractual risk and supply these various types of clients.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
Issue (Month): 8 (August)
Pages: 1436-1452

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:8:p:1436-1452
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  1. Paul Mosley, 1999. "Micro-macro linkages in financial markets: the impact of financial liberalization on access to rural credit in four African countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 367-384.
  2. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  3. Jonathan Conning & Christopher Udry, 2005. "Rural Financial Markets in Developing Countries," Working Papers 914, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  4. Barham, Bradford L. & Boucher, Stephen & Carter, Michael R., 1996. "Credit constraints, credit unions, and small-scale producers in Guatemala," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 793-806, May.
  5. Steve Boucher & Catherine Guirkinger, 2007. "Risk, Wealth, and Sectoral Choice in Rural Credit Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(4), pages 991-1004.
  6. Boucher, Stephen R. & Guirkinger, Catherine, 2007. "AJAE Appendix: Risk, Wealth and Sectoral Choice in Rural Credit Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics Appendices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(4), November.
  7. Bell, Clive & Srinivasan, T N & Udry, Christopher, 1997. "Rationing, Spillover, and Interlinking in Credit Markets: The Case of Rural Punjab," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(4), pages 557-85, October.
  8. Jappelli, Tullio, 1990. "Who Is Credit Constrained in the U.S. Economy?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 105(1), pages 219-34, February.
  9. Hoff, Karla & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1990. "Imperfect Information and Rural Credit Markets--Puzzles and Policy Perspectives," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 4(3), pages 235-50, September.
  10. Stephen R. Boucher & Michael R. Carter & Catherine Guirkinger, 2008. "Risk Rationing and Wealth Effects in Credit Markets: Theory and Implications for Agricultural Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(2), pages 409-423.
  11. Boucher, Stephen R. & Guirkinger, Catherine & Trivelli, Carolina, 2005. "Direct elicitation of credit constraints: Conceptual and practical issues with an empirical application," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19272, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  12. Carter, Michael R., 1988. "Equilibrium credit rationing of small farm agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 83-103, February.
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