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The power of beliefs: Evidence on the influence of trust on self-assessed health

Author

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  • Martin Ljunge

    (University of Copenhagen and SITE)

Abstract

This paper estimates the influence of trust on self-assessed health. Second generation immigrants in a broad set of European countries with ancestry from across the world are studied. There is a significant positive effect of trust on selfassessed health. Health has both intrinsic and instrumental value. The finding provides evidence for one mechanism through which trust creates desirable outcomes. Individuals with high trust feel healthier. As health may promote a more productive life, it may be one channel through which trust increases national income. The results suggest policy put more emphasis on promoting social trust.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Ljunge, 2012. "The power of beliefs: Evidence on the influence of trust on self-assessed health," Discussion Papers 12-12, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:1212
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/dp_2012/1212.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yann Algan & Pierre Cahuc, 2010. "Inherited Trust and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2060-2092, December.
    2. Erzo F. P. Luttmer & Monica Singhal, 2011. "Culture, Context, and the Taste for Redistribution," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 157-179, February.
    3. Johnson, Noel D. & Mislin, Alexandra, 2012. "How much should we trust the World Values Survey trust question?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 210-212.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ljunge, Martin, 2014. "Trust issues: Evidence on the intergenerational trust transmission among children of immigrants," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 175-196.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trust; self-assessed health; subjective health; intergenerational transmission; cultural transmission;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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