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Do Battery-Switching Systems Accelerate the Adoption of Electric Vehicles? A Stated Preference Study

Author

Listed:
  • Nobuyuki Ito

    () (Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University)

  • Kenji Takeuchi

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

  • Shunsuke Managi

    () (Urban Institute & School of Engineering, Kyushu University)

Abstract

We estimate willingness-to-pay (WTP) for battery-switching electric vehicles (SEVs) by using a stated choice experiment. Our estimation results show that individuals have high WTP for SEVs, provided sufficient battery-switching stations exist. When battery-switching infrastructure represents 50% of the current number of gasoline stations, individuals are indifferent between conventional gasoline vehicles and SEVs, which have a 521 thousand yen lower price than gasoline vehicles. Moreover, the estimation results suggest that vehicle drivers may recognize SEVs as vehicles for shorter drives such as daily shopping trips and thereby have lower marginal WTP with respect to cruising range.

Suggested Citation

  • Nobuyuki Ito & Kenji Takeuchi & Shunsuke Managi, 2016. "Do Battery-Switching Systems Accelerate the Adoption of Electric Vehicles? A Stated Preference Study," Discussion Papers 1645, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1645
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bunch, David S. & Bradley, Mark & Golob, Thomas F. & Kitamura, Ryuichi & Occhiuzzo, Gareth P., 1993. "Demand for clean-fuel vehicles in California: A discrete-choice stated preference pilot project," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 237-253, May.
    2. Dimitropoulos, Alexandros & Rietveld, Piet & van Ommeren, Jos N., 2013. "Consumer valuation of changes in driving range: A meta-analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 27-45.
    3. Brownstone, David & Bunch, David S. & Train, Kenneth, 2000. "Joint mixed logit models of stated and revealed preferences for alternative-fuel vehicles," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 315-338, June.
    4. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
    5. Nobuyuki Ito & Kenji Takeuchi & Shunsuke Managi, 2012. "Willingness to pay for the infrastructure investments for alternative fuel vehicles," Discussion Papers 1207, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    6. Daziano, Ricardo A., 2013. "Conditional-logit Bayes estimators for consumer valuation of electric vehicle driving range," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 429-450.
    7. Beggs, S. & Cardell, S. & Hausman, J., 1981. "Assessing the potential demand for electric cars," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-19, September.
    8. Buket Avci & Karan Girotra & Serguei Netessine, 2015. "Electric Vehicles with a Battery Switching Station: Adoption and Environmental Impact," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 61(4), pages 772-794, April.
    9. Axsen, Jonn & Orlebar, Caroline & Skippon, Stephen, 2013. "Social influence and consumer preference formation for pro-environmental technology: The case of a U.K. workplace electric-vehicle study," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 96-107.
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    Cited by:

    1. Webb, Jeremy, 2019. "The future of transport: Literature review and overview," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-6.
    2. Hackbarth, André & Madlener, Reinhard, 2018. "Combined Vehicle Type and Fuel Type Choices of Private Households: An Empirical Analysis for Germany," FCN Working Papers 17/2018, E.ON Energy Research Center, Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN), revised May 2019.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    electric vehicle; battery-switching stations; stated preference method; choice experiment; willingness-to-pay;

    JEL classification:

    • L62 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Automobiles; Other Transportation Equipment; Related Parts and Equipment
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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