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The Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Firms: A Spatial Analysis

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Listed:
  • Matthew A. Cole

    (Department of Economics, University of Birmingham)

  • Robert J R Elliott

    (University of Birmingham)

  • Toshihiro Okubo

    (Keio University, Japan)

  • Ying Zhou

    (Aston University, UK)

Abstract

In order to gain a greater understanding of firms' 'environmental behaviour' this paper explores the factors that influence firms' emissions intensities and provides the first analysis of the determinants of firm level carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Focussing on Japan, the paper also examines whether firms' CO2 emissions are influenced by the emissions of neighbouring firms and other possible sources of spatial correlation. Results suggest that size, the capital-labour ratio, R&D expenditure, the extent of exports and concern for public profile are the key determinants of CO2 emissions. Local lobbying pressure, as captured by regional community characteristics, does not appear to play a role, however emissions are found to be spatially correlated. This raises implications for the manner in which the environmental performance of firms is modelled in future.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew A. Cole & Robert J R Elliott & Toshihiro Okubo & Ying Zhou, 2012. "The Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Firms: A Spatial Analysis," Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Discussion Paper Series 2012-003, Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Program.
  • Handle: RePEc:kei:dpaper:2012-003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Valeria Costantini & Francesco Crespi & Giovanni Marin & Elena Paglialunga, 2016. "Eco-innovation, sustainable supply chains and environmental performance in European industries," LEM Papers Series 2016/19, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    2. Forslid, Rikard & Okubo, Toshihiro & Ulltveit-Moe, Karen-Helene, 2011. "Why are firms that export cleaner? International trade and CO2 emissions," CEPR Discussion Papers 8583, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Chen, Shuai & Chen, Xiaoguang & Xu, Jintao, 2013. "Impacts of Climate Change on Corn and Soybean Yields in China," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149739, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:548-:d:95055 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy & Marklund, Per-Olov, 2014. "Carbon intensity in production and the effects of climate policy—Evidence from Swedish industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 844-857.
    6. Li Li & Xuefei Hong & Dengli Tang & Ming Na, 2016. "GHG Emissions, Economic Growth and Urbanization: A Spatial Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(5), pages 1-16, May.
    7. repec:eee:eecrev:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:373-391 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:ecolec:v:144:y:2018:i:c:p:27-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Matthew A. COLE & Robert R.J. ELLIOTT & OKUBO Toshihiro & Liyun ZHANG, 2017. "The Pollution Outsourcing Hypothesis: An empirical test for Japan," Discussion papers 17096, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    10. Huang, Ling & Zhou, Yishu, 2016. "Carbon Prices and Fuel Switching: A Quasi-experiment in Electricity Markets," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236179, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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