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Globalization, Firm-Level Characteristics and Environmental Management: A Study of Japan

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  • Matthew Cole, Robert Elliott and Kenichi Shimamoto

Abstract

Using Japanese firm-level data, we identify and quantify the factors that influence the environmental management of Japanese firms. We measure 14 different aspects of a firm’s environmental management and investigate how firm-level characteristics and external pressures affect the quantity and effectiveness of environmental management systems and structures. Our results show that one consequence of the growth in international trade and FDI is that Japanese firms are increasingly aware of their environmental obligations and that both regulatory and non-regulatory factors play a role in a firm’s decision to quantify and manage the impact their activities have on the environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Cole, Robert Elliott and Kenichi Shimamoto, 2005. "Globalization, Firm-Level Characteristics and Environmental Management: A Study of Japan," Discussion Papers 05-17, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
  • Handle: RePEc:bir:birmec:05-17
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    File URL: ftp://ftp.bham.ac.uk/pub/RePEc/pdf/JapEnvManagement.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Lucchesi & Matthew A. Cole & Robert J. R. Elliot & Naercio A. Menezes-Filho, 2016. "Determinants Of Environmental Innovation In Brazilian Manufacturing Industries," Anais do XLII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 42nd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 143, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    2. Stefanie Haller & Liam Murphy, 2012. "Corporate Expenditure on Environmental Protection," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 51(2), pages 277-296, February.
    3. Iwata, Hiroki & Okada, Keisuke, 2011. "How does environmental performance affect financial performance? Evidence from Japanese manufacturing firms," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(9), pages 1691-1700, July.
    4. Wong, Christina W.Y. & Lai, Kee-hung & Shang, Kuo-Chung & Lu, Chin-Shan & Leung, T.K.P., 2012. "Green operations and the moderating role of environmental management capability of suppliers on manufacturing firm performance," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 283-294.
    5. Larivière, Jean-Michel & He, Jie, 2012. "L’impact de la taille des firmes industrielles sur la courbe de Kuznets environnementale : le cas des émissions de SO2 en Chine," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 88(1), pages 5-36, mars.
    6. Svetlana Batrakova & Ronald Davies, 2012. "Is there an environmental benefit to being an exporter? Evidence from firm-level data," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 148(3), pages 449-474, September.
    7. Facundo Albornoz & Matthew A. Cole & Robert J. R. Elliott & Marco G. Ercolani, 2009. "In Search of Environmental Spillovers," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(1), pages 136-163, January.
    8. Roy, Jayjit & Yasar, Mahmut, 2015. "Energy efficiency and exporting: Evidence from firm-level data," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 127-135.
    9. Xavier Pautrel, 2015. "Abatement Technology and the Environment–Growth Nexus with Education," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 61(3), pages 297-318, July.
    10. Mingjun Hou & Heng Liu & Peihua Fan & Zelong Wei, 2016. "Does CSR practice pay off in East Asian firms? A meta-analytic investigation," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 195-228, March.
    11. repec:eee:ecolec:v:140:y:2017:i:c:p:99-109 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. R. Bracke & T. Verbeke & V. Dejonckheere, 2007. "What distinguishes EMAS participants? An exploration of company characteristics," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 07/459, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    13. Ramstetter, Eric D. & Haji Ahmad, Shahrazat Binti, 2013. "Do Multinationals Use Energy Relatively Efficiently in Malaysian Manufacturing? Additional Evidence for the Early 21st Century," AGI Working Paper Series 2013-18, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    14. Ronald B. Davies & T. Huw Edwards & Arman Mazhikeyev, 2016. "The Impact of Special Economic Zones on Electricity Intensity of Firms," Working Papers 201615, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    15. Emilio Galdeano-Gómez, 2010. "Exporting and Environmental Performance: A Firm-level Productivity Analysis," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 60-88, January.
    16. Iwata, Hiroki & Okada, Keisuke, 2010. "How does environmental performance affect financial performance? Evidence from Japanese manufacturing firms," MPRA Paper 27721, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Jing Lan & Makoto Kakinaka & Xianguo Huang, 2012. "Foreign Direct Investment, Human Capital and Environmental Pollution in China," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 51(2), pages 255-275, February.
    18. David C Broadstock & Alan Collins & Lester C Hunt & Konstantinos Vergos, 2014. "Voluntary Disclosure, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Business Performance: Assessing the First Decade of Reporting," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 149, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    19. Tang, Ailie K.Y. & Lai, Kee-hung & Cheng, T.C.E., 2016. "A Multi-research-method approach to studying environmental sustainability in retail operations," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 171(P3), pages 394-404.
    20. Roeland Bracke & Tom Verbeke & Veerle Dejonckheere, 2008. "What Determines the Decision to Implement EMAS? A European Firm Level Study," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(4), pages 499-518, December.
    21. Matthew A. COLE & Robert R.J. ELLIOTT & OKUBO Toshihiro & Liyun ZHANG, 2017. "The Pollution Outsourcing Hypothesis: An empirical test for Japan," Discussion papers 17096, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization; Environment; Firm Characteristics; Management;

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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