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Costs and Benefits of Labour Mobility between the EU and the Eastern Partnership Countries: Country Study on Germany

  • Biavaschi, Costanza

    ()

    (IZA)

  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    ()

    (IZA and University of Bonn)

Despite the ongoing dialogue on facilitating mobility between the European Union and the Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries, very little is known about the magnitude and characteristics of migrants from these countries. This study aims to fill this gap by studying the size and assimilation patterns of EaP migrants in Germany. Most EaP migrants in Germany come from Ukraine but EaP migrants are a relatively small share of total migrants. EaP migrants experience worse labor market outcomes than other migrant groups, but current and potential migrants hold qualifications in those areas were skill shortages are expected.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/pp72.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Policy Papers with number 72.

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Length: 59 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izapps:pp72
Contact details of provider: Postal: IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
Phone: +49 228 3894 223
Fax: +49 228 3894 180
Web page: http://www.iza.org

Order Information: Postal: IZA, Margard Ody, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
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  1. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
  2. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri, 2012. "Rethinking The Effect Of Immigration On Wages," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 152-197, 02.
  3. Brenke, Karl & Yuksel, Mutlu & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2009. "EU Enlargement under Continued Mobility Restrictions: Consequences for the German Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 4055, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Caglar Ozden & Christopher R. Parsons & Maurice Schiff & Terrie L. Walmsley, 2011. "Where on Earth is Everybody? The Evolution of Global Bilateral Migration 1960-2000," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 12-56, May.
  5. Ludwig Dorffmeister, 2010. "Neun von zehn Firmen rechnen für 2020 mit einem Fachkräftemangel," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 63(24), pages 80-82, December.
  6. Matloob Piracha & Florin Vadean, 2013. "Migrant educational mismatch and the labor market," Chapters, in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 9, pages 176-192 Edward Elgar.
  7. Bonin, Holger, 2002. "Eine fiskalische Gesamtbilanz der Zuwanderung nach Deutschland," IZA Discussion Papers 516, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Karl Brenke, 2010. "Fachkräftemangel kurzfristig noch nicht in Sicht," DIW Wochenbericht, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 77(46), pages 2-15.
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