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The Role of Short-Time Work Schemes during the Global Financial Crisis and Early Recovery: A Cross-Country Analysis

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  • Hijzen, Alexander

    () (OECD)

  • Martin, Sébastien

    () (OECD)

Abstract

There has been a strong interest in short-time work (STW) schemes during the global financial crisis. Using data for 23 OECD countries for the period 2004 Q1 to 2010 Q4, this paper analyses the quantitative effects of STW programmes on labour market outcomes. Special attention is given to the dynamic aspects of the relationship between output shocks and labour market outcomes. The results indicate the STW raises hours flexibility by increasing the output elasticity of working time and helps to preserve jobs in the context of a recession by making employment and unemployment less elastic with respect to output. A key finding is that the timing of STW is crucial. While STW helped preserving a significant number of jobs during the crisis, its continued use during the recovery may have slowed the job-content of the recovery. By the end of 2010, the net effect of STW on employment was negligible or may even have become negative. However, the gross impact of STW on the number of jobs saved per quarter remains large and positive in the majority of countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Hijzen, Alexander & Martin, Sébastien, 2013. "The Role of Short-Time Work Schemes during the Global Financial Crisis and Early Recovery: A Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7291, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7291
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:izalpo:v:8:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1186_s40173-019-0107-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Helge Braun & Björn Brügemann, 2014. "Welfare Effects of Short-Time Compensation," CESifo Working Paper Series 5063, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Cahuc, Pierre & Nevoux, Sandra, 2017. "Inefficient Short-Time Work," IZA Discussion Papers 11010, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Volker Meier, 2018. "Short-time Work Subsidies in a Matching Model," CESifo Working Paper Series 7281, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Pierre Cahuc & Francis Kramarz & Sandra Nevoux, 2018. "When Short-Time Work Works," Sciences Po publications 2018-03, Sciences Po.
    6. Björn Brey & Matthias S. Hertweck, 2016. "The extension of short-time work schemes during the Great Recession: A story of success?," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2016-05, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    7. repec:iza:izawol:journl:2019:n:11 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Aida Caldera Sánchez & Morten Rasmussen & Oliver Röhn, 2016. "Economic Resilience: What Role for Policies?," Journal of International Commerce, Economics and Policy (JICEP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 7(02), pages 1-44, June.
    9. Tracey, Marlon R. & Polachek, Solomon, 2018. "Heterogeneous Layoff Effects of the US Short-Time Compensation Program," IZA Discussion Papers 11746, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Andrea Brandolini & Francesca Carta & Francesco D'Amuri, 2016. "A Feasible Unemployment-Based Shock Absorber for the Euro Area," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(5), pages 1123-1141, September.
    11. Verónica Escudero, 2018. "Are active labour market policies effective in activating and integrating low-skilled individuals? An international comparison," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-26, December.
    12. Reamonn Lydon & Thomas Y. Mathä & Stephen Millard, 2019. "Short-time work in the Great Recession: firm-level evidence from 20 EU countries," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-29, December.
    13. Holtemöller, Oliver & Brautzsch, Hans-Ulrich & Drechsel, Katja & Drygalla, Andrej & Giesen, Sebastian & Hennecke, Peter & Kiesel, Konstantin & Loose, Brigitte & Meier, Carsten-Patrick & Zeddies, Götz, 2015. "Ökonomische Wirksamkeit der Konjunktur stützenden finanzpolitischen Maßnahmen der Jahre 2008 und 2009. Forschungsvorhaben im Auftrag des Bundesministeriums der Finanzen," IWH Online 4/2015, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    14. repec:bla:brjirl:v:56:y:2018:i:1:p:189-222 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Anna Godøy & Knut Røed, 2016. "Unemployment Insurance and Underemployment," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 30(2), pages 158-179, June.
    16. Verónica Escudero, 2015. "Are active labour market policies effective in activating and integrating low-skilled individuals? An international comparison," Working Papers halshs-01105347, HAL.
    17. Paula Garda & Volker Ziemann, 2014. "Economic Policies and Microeconomic Stability: A Literature Review and Some Empirics," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1115, OECD Publishing.
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    19. repec:ilo:ilowps:487304 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    work sharing; partial unemployment benefits; global financial crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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