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Neighborhood Quality and Student Performance

Author

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  • Weinhardt, Felix

    (European University Viadrina, Frankfurt / Oder)

Abstract

Children who grow up in deprived neighborhoods underperform at school and later in life but whether there is a causal link remains contested. This study estimates the effect of very deprived neighborhoods, characterized by a high density of social housing, on the educational attainment of fourteen years old students in England. To identify the causal impact, this study exploits the timing of moving into these neighborhoods. I argue that the timing can be taken as exogenous because of long waiting lists for social housing in high-demand areas. Using this approach, I find no evidence for effects on student performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Weinhardt, Felix, 2013. "Neighborhood Quality and Student Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 7139, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7139
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gibbons, Stephen & Silva, Olmo & Weinhardt, Felix, 2017. "Neighbourhood Turnover and Teenage Attainment," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 746-783.
    2. Weinhardt, Felix, 2014. "Social housing, neighborhood quality and student performance," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 12-31.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    neighborhood effects; housing policy;

    JEL classification:

    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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