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Peer Salaries and Employee Satisfaction in the Workplace

Author

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  • Mumford, Karen A.

    () (University of York)

  • Smith, Peter N.

    () (University of York)

Abstract

We explore the relationship between reported job satisfaction and own wage, relative wage and average comparison group wage; allowing for asymmetry in these responses across genders. We find that the choice of relevant comparison group is affected by gender in Britain; men display behaviour characteristic of competitiveness whilst women do not.

Suggested Citation

  • Mumford, Karen A. & Smith, Peter N., 2012. "Peer Salaries and Employee Satisfaction in the Workplace," IZA Discussion Papers 6673, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6673
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mill, John Stuart, 1848. "Principles of Political Economy (II): Distribution," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, volume 2, number mill1848-2.
    2. AndrewE. Clark & Claudia Senik, 2010. "Who Compares to Whom? The Anatomy of Income Comparisons in Europe," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(544), pages 573-594, May.
    3. Mill, John Stuart, 1848. "Principles of Political Economy (III): Exchange," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, volume 3, number mill1848-3.
    4. AndrewE. Clark & Nicolai Kristensen & Niels Westergård-Nielsen, 2009. "Job Satisfaction and Co-worker Wages: Status or Signal?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(536), pages 430-447, March.
    5. repec:adr:anecst:y:2001:i:63-64:p:03 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Mill, John Stuart, 1848. "Principles of Political Economy (I): Production," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, volume 1, number mill1848-1.
    7. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
    8. Daniel J. Zizzo & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Are People Willing to Pay to Reduce Others'Incomes?," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 63-64, pages 39-65.
    9. Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2005. "Income and well-being: an empirical analysis of the comparison income effect," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 997-1019, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stuart C. Carr & Jane Parker & James Arrowsmith & Jarrod Haar & Harvey Jones, 0. "Humanistic Management and Living Wages: a Case of Compelling Connections?," Humanistic Management Journal, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-22.
    2. Grund, Christian & Martin, Johannes, 2012. "Monetary Reference Points of Managers: An Empirical Investigation of Status Quo Preferences and Social Comparisons," IZA Discussion Papers 7097, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Rodrigo Montero & Diego Vásquez, 2015. "Job Satisfaction and Reference Wages: Evidence for a Developing Country," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(6), pages 1493-1507, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; earnings; job satisfaction; segregation; workplace;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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