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The Impact of Female Employment on Male Wages and Careers: Evidence from the English Banking Industry, 1890-1941

Author

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  • Seltzer, Andrew

    () (Royal Holloway, University of London)

Abstract

The late 19th and early 20th century British labour market experienced an influx of female clerical workers. Employers argued that female employment increased opportunities for men to advance; however, most male clerks regarded this expansion of the labour supply as a threat to their pay and status. This paper examines the effects of female employment on male clerks using data from Williams Deacon's Bank covering a period 25 years prior and 25 years subsequent to the initial employment of women. It is shown that within position women were substitutes for men, although the degree of substitutability was less for older men than for juniors. In addition, the employment of women in routine positions allowed the Bank to expand its branch network, creating new higher-level positions, which were almost always filled by men.

Suggested Citation

  • Seltzer, Andrew, 2012. "The Impact of Female Employment on Male Wages and Careers: Evidence from the English Banking Industry, 1890-1941," IZA Discussion Papers 6663, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6663
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Burnette,Joyce, 2008. "Gender, Work and Wages in Industrial Revolution Britain," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521880633.
    2. Seltzer, Andrew, 2010. "Did firms cut nominal wages in a deflationary environment?: Micro-level evidence from the late 19th and early 20th century banking industry," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 112-125, January.
    3. Andrew Seltzer, 2010. "Salaries and promotion opportunities in the English banking industry, 1890-1936," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(5), pages 737-759.
    4. Seltzer, Andrew J., 2011. "Female salaries and careers in British banking, 1915–41," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 461-477.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    internal labour markets; spill over effects; female employment; clerical labour markets;

    JEL classification:

    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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