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Paid Work after Retirement: Recent Trends in Denmark

Author

Listed:
  • Larsen, Mona

    () (Danish National Centre for Social Research (SFI))

  • Pedersen, Peder J.

    () (Aarhus University)

Abstract

The labor market in Denmark seems to follow the trend in a number of other countries of increasing labor force participation in the 60+ group. We analyze trends for the early retirement age interval 60-64 and for the age group 65-74 where people are eligible to a national social security program from age 65. Until now, the increase in labor force participation has been most pronounced among 60-64-year-olds and among women. We find significant impact on work after retirement from education, gender, home ownership, aggregate unemployment at the time of retirement, age and education. Being married has a positive impact for men and a negative impact for women. We relate labor force participation after retirement to the cyclical situation and to the several policy reforms introduced since 1980.

Suggested Citation

  • Larsen, Mona & Pedersen, Peder J., 2012. "Paid Work after Retirement: Recent Trends in Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 6537, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6537
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven Haider & David Loughran, 2001. "Elderly Labor Supply: Work or Play?," Working Papers 01-09, RAND Corporation.
    2. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Introduction to "Social Security and Retirement around the World"," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security and Retirement around the World, pages 1-35 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Hendrik P. Van Dalen & Kène Henkens & Joop Schippers, 2010. "How do employers cope with an ageing workforce?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(32), pages 1015-1036, June.
    4. Nicole Maestas & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2010. "How Longer Work Lives Ease the Crunch of Population Aging," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 139-160, Winter.
    5. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement around the World," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub99-1.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maya Rossin-Slater & Miriam Wüst, 2016. "Parental Responses to Child Support Obligations: Evidence from Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 22227, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    retirement; labor force participation;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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