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Do School-to-Work Programs Help the "Forgotten Half"?

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  • Neumark, David

    () (University of California, Irvine)

  • Rothstein, Donna

    () (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Abstract

This paper tests whether school-to-work (STW) programs are particularly beneficial for those less likely to go to college in their absence – often termed the "forgotten half" in the STW literature. The empirical analysis is based on the NLSY97, which allows us to study six types of STW programs, including job shadowing, mentoring, coop, school enterprises, tech prep, and internships/apprenticeships. For men there is quite a bit of evidence that STW program participation is particularly advantageous for those in the forgotten half. For these men, specifically, mentoring and coop programs increase post-secondary education, and coop, school enterprise, and internship/apprenticeship programs boost employment and decrease idleness after leaving high school. There is less evidence that STW programs are particularly beneficial for women in the forgotten half, although internship/apprenticeship programs do lead to positive earnings effects concentrated among these women.

Suggested Citation

  • Neumark, David & Rothstein, Donna, 2005. "Do School-to-Work Programs Help the "Forgotten Half"?," IZA Discussion Papers 1740, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1740
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Neumark, David, 2006. "Evaluating program effectiveness: A case study of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act in California," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 315-326, June.
    2. James Heckman & Neil Hohmann & Jeffrey Smith & Michael Khoo, 2000. "Substitution and Dropout Bias in Social Experiments: A Study of an Influential Social Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 651-694.
    3. Neumark, David & Rothstein, Donna, 2006. "School-to-career programs and transitions to employment and higher education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 374-393, August.
    4. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1999. "The Dynamics of Educational Attainment for Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites," NBER Working Papers 7249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Stern, David & Finkelstein, Neal & Urquiola, Miguel & Cagampang, Helen, 1997. "What difference does it make if school and work are connected? Evidence on co-operative education in the United States," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 213-229, June.
    6. Evangelos M. Falaris & H. Elizabeth Peters, 1998. "Survey Attrition and Schooling Choices," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 531-554.
    7. Debra Donahoe & Marta Tienda, 1999. "Human Asset Development and the Transition from School to Work: Policy Lessons for the 21st Century," Working Papers 322, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Office of Population Research..
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    1. In Praise of David Neumark
      by Adam Ozimek in Modeled Behavior on 2015-07-30 05:07:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Di Meglio, Gisela & Barge-Gil, Andrés & Camiña, Ester & Moreno, Lourdes, 2019. "Knocking on Employment´s Door: Internships and Job Attainment," MPRA Paper 95712, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    school-to-career; school-to-work; education; employment;

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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