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Wage Growth and Job Mobility in the U.K. and Germany


  • Dustmann, Christian

    () (University College London)

  • Pereira, Sonia C.

    () (University College London)


This paper investigates job mobility and estimates the returns to tenure and experience in the United Kingdom and Germany. We show evidence that job mobility is higher in the UK than in Germany, and that job movers may be negatively selected in Germany, but not in the UK. Our findings suggest that returns to experience are substantially higher in the UK. According to our estimates, ten years of labour market experience are associated with average wage returns of around 70 percent in the UK and 30 percent in Germany. Separate estimates for different qualification groups show that in Germany, it is the group of workers with apprenticeship training that is driving the low returns to labour market experience, while wages growth due to labour market experience is similar between the two countries for the other skill groups. Furthermore, returns to tenure are close to zero in both countries, while wage growth due to the macro trend is markedly higher in Germany.

Suggested Citation

  • Dustmann, Christian & Pereira, Sonia C., 2005. "Wage Growth and Job Mobility in the U.K. and Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1586, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1586

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1999. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 539-572, June.
    2. Joseph G. Altonji & Robert A. Shakotko, 1987. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 437-459.
    3. Joseph G. Altonji & Nicolas Williams, 1992. "The Effects of Labor Market Experience, Job Seniority, and Job Mobility on Wage Growth," NBER Working Papers 4133, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Joseph G. Altonji & Nicolas Williams, 2005. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority? A Reassessment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(3), pages 370-397, April.
    5. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1996. "International Differences in Male Wage Inequality: Institutions versus Market Forces," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 791-836, August.
    6. Abraham, Katharine G & Farber, Henry S, 1987. "Job Duration, Seniority, and Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 278-297, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrietti, Vincenzo & Patacchini, Eleonora, 2004. "Occupationa pensions, wages and tenure wage profiles," UC3M Working papers. Economics we043612, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    2. Gielen, A. C. & van Ours, J.C., 2006. "Why do Worker-Firm Matches Dissolve?," Discussion Paper 2006-57, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. Alexander K. Koch & Eloïc Peyrache, 2011. "Aligning Ambition and Incentives," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(3), pages 655-688.
    4. Piekkola, Hannu, 2006. "Tax cuts and employment: Evidence from Finnish linked employer-employee data," Discussion Papers 1041, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    5. Koch, Alexander K. & Peyrache, Eloïc, 2008. "Moral hazard contracts: Does one size fit all?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 399-401, September.
    6. Roland A. Amann & Tobias J. Klein, 2012. "Returns to type or tenure?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 175(1), pages 153-166, January.
    7. Koch, Alexander K. & Peyrache, Eloic, 2005. "Tournaments, Individualized Contracts and Career Concerns," IZA Discussion Papers 1841, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item


    returns to seniority; job mobility; asymmetric information;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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