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Wage Growth and Job Mobility in the U.K. and Germany

  • Dustmann, Christian

    ()

    (University College London)

  • Pereira, Sonia C.

    ()

    (University College London)

This paper investigates job mobility and estimates the returns to tenure and experience in the United Kingdom and Germany. We show evidence that job mobility is higher in the UK than in Germany, and that job movers may be negatively selected in Germany, but not in the UK. Our findings suggest that returns to experience are substantially higher in the UK. According to our estimates, ten years of labour market experience are associated with average wage returns of around 70 percent in the UK and 30 percent in Germany. Separate estimates for different qualification groups show that in Germany, it is the group of workers with apprenticeship training that is driving the low returns to labour market experience, while wages growth due to labour market experience is similar between the two countries for the other skill groups. Furthermore, returns to tenure are close to zero in both countries, while wage growth due to the macro trend is markedly higher in Germany.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp1586.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1586.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: May 2005
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2008, 61 (3), 374 - 393
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1586
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  1. Joseph Altonji & R. Shakotko, 1985. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority?," Working Papers 567, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. Abraham, Katharine G & Farber, Henry S, 1987. "Job Duration, Seniority, and Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 278-97, June.
  3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 1996. "Why do Firms Train? Theory and Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 1460, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1999. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 539-572, June.
  5. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1996. "International Differences in Male Wage Inequality: Institutions versus Market Forces," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 791-836, August.
  6. Joseph G. Altonji & Nicolas Williams, 1992. "The Effects of Labor Market Experience, Job Seniority, and Job Mobility on Wage Growth," NBER Working Papers 4133, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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