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Monetary Policy Transmission to Consumer Financial Stress and Durable Consumption

Author

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  • Georgarakos, Dimitris

    (European Central Bank)

  • Tatsiramos, Konstantinos

    (University of Luxembourg, LISER)

Abstract

We examine the effects of monetary policy on household self-assessed financial stress and durable consumption using panel data from eighteen annual waves of the British Household Panel Survey. For identification, we exploit random variation in household exposure to interest rates generated by the random timing of household interview dates with respect to policy rate changes. After accounting for household and month-year-of-interview fixed effects, we uncover significant heterogeneities in the way monetary policy affects household groups that differ in housing and saving status. In particular, an increase in the interest rate induces financial stress among mortgagors and renters, while it lessens financial stress of savers. We find symmetric effects on durable consumption, mainly driven by mortgagors with high debt burden or limited access to liquidity and younger renters who are prospective home buyers.

Suggested Citation

  • Georgarakos, Dimitris & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos, 2019. "Monetary Policy Transmission to Consumer Financial Stress and Durable Consumption," IZA Discussion Papers 12359, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12359
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    Cited by:

    1. Ampudia, Miguel & Georgarakos, Dimitris & Slacalek, Jiri & Tristani, Oreste & Vermeulen, Philip & Violante, Giovanni L., 2018. "Monetary policy and household inequality," Working Paper Series 2170, European Central Bank.
    2. Olivier Coibion & Dimitris Georgarakos & Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Michael Weber, 2020. "Forward Guidance and Household Expectations," Working Papers 2020-07, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    3. Fergus Cumming & Paul Hubert, 2019. "The Role of Households' Borrowing Constraints in the Transmission of Monetary Policy This paper investigates how the transmission of monetary policy to the real economy depends on the distribution of ," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2019-20, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. Cumming, Fergus & Hubert, Paul, 2019. "The role of households’ borrowing constraints in the transmission of monetary policy," Bank of England working papers 836, Bank of England, revised 06 Jan 2020.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; mortgage debt; debt burden; financial stress; consumption;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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