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Child Discipline in Times of Conflict

Author

Listed:
  • Malcolm, Michael

    () (West Chester University of Pennsylvania)

  • Diwakar, Vidya

    () (Overseas Development Institute)

  • Naufal, George S

    () (Texas A&M University)

Abstract

Using a unique pairing of household survey data and geolocational conflict data, we investigate the relationship between local conflict intensity and the disciplinary methods employed by Iraqi households. We find that parents in high-conflict areas are more likely to use both moderate and severe corporal punishment, and are less likely to use constructive parenting techniques like redirection. While there is a general sense that war has profound long-term impacts on the psychological health of children, research on transmission mechanisms is very limited. These are among the first results that rigorously document an association between violent conflict and child maltreatment and, to our knowledge, the first that document changes in child discipline practices even across a mainstream parenting spectrum. Given the persistence of early childhood outcomes into adulthood, these results are potentially an important piece of assessing and mitigating the long-term costs of war on the civilian population.

Suggested Citation

  • Malcolm, Michael & Diwakar, Vidya & Naufal, George S, 2017. "Child Discipline in Times of Conflict," IZA Discussion Papers 10936, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10936
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Malcolm, 2012. "Can buy me love: the effect of child welfare expenditures on maltreatment outcomes," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(28), pages 3725-3736, October.
    2. Eli Berman & Jacob N. Shapiro & Joseph H. Felter, 2011. "Can Hearts and Minds Be Bought? The Economics of Counterinsurgency in Iraq," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(4), pages 766-819.
    3. repec:oup:revage:v:29:y:2007:i:3:p:446-493. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. James J. Heckman & Dimitriy V. Masterov, 2007. "The Productivity Argument for Investing in Young Children," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 29(3), pages 446-493.
    5. Vinck, Patrick & Pham, Phuong N., 2013. "Association of exposure to intimate-partner physical violence and potentially traumatic war-related events with mental health in Liberia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 41-49.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Iraq war; child discipline; mental health; Middle East; household interactions;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • N45 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Asia including Middle East

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