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Immigration Enforcement and Foster Care Placements

Author

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  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina

    () (San Diego State University)

  • Arenas-Arroyo, Esther

    () (Queen Mary, University of London)

Abstract

Tougher immigration enforcement has been responsible for approximately 1.8 million deportations between 2009 and 2013 alone. Children enter the foster care system when their parents are apprehended, deported and unable to care for them. We find that the average increase in interior immigration enforcement over the 2001 through 2015 period contributed to raising the share of Hispanic children in foster care anywhere between 15 and 21 percent. The effects appear to be driven by the implementation of police-based local initiatives linked to deportations, as in the case of the Secure Communities program. Given the revival of police-based immigration enforcement by President Donald Trump, further analyses of its consequences on families are well warranted.

Suggested Citation

  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Arenas-Arroyo, Esther, 2017. "Immigration Enforcement and Foster Care Placements," IZA Discussion Papers 10850, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10850
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joseph J. Doyle Jr., 2007. "Child Protection and Child Outcomes: Measuring the Effects of Foster Care," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(5), pages 1583-1610, December.
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    4. Tara Watson, 2014. "Inside the Refrigerator: Immigration Enforcement and Chilling Effects in Medicaid Participation," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 313-338, August.
    5. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
    6. Vinnerljung, Bo & Sundell, Knut & Lofholm, Cecilia Andree & Humlesjo, Eva, 2006. "Former Stockholm child protection cases as young adults: Do outcomes differ between those that received services and those that did not?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 59-77, January.
    7. Scott Cunningham & Keith Finlay, 2013. "Parental Substance Use And Foster Care: Evidence From Two Methamphetamine Supply Shocks," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(1), pages 764-782, January.
    8. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2016. "Do state work eligibility verification laws reduce unauthorized immigration?," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-17, December.
    9. Pope, Nolan G., 2016. "The Effects of DACAmentation: The Impact of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on Unauthorized Immigrants," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 98-114.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration enforcement; unauthorized immigration; foster care; United States;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • K37 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Immigration Law

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