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Overeducation in Europe: Trends, Convergence and Drivers

Author

Listed:
  • McGuinness, Seamus

    () (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

  • Bergin, Adele

    () (ESRI, Dublin)

  • Whelan, Adele

    () (ESRI, Dublin)

Abstract

This paper examines patterns in overeducation between countries using a specifically designed panel dataset constructed from the quarterly Labour Force Surveys of 28 EU countries over a twelve to fifteen year period. It is not the case that overeducation has been rising rapidly over time in all countries and where overeducation has grown the trend has been very gradual. Furthermore, overeducation rates were found to be static or falling in approximately fifty percent of the 28 EU countries. The evidence points towards convergence in overeducation at a rate of 3.3 percent per annum. In terms of the determinants of overeducation we find evidence to support policies aimed at improving effective female participation, labour market flexibility and the practical aspects of educational provision as a means of reducing the incidence of overeducation within countries.

Suggested Citation

  • McGuinness, Seamus & Bergin, Adele & Whelan, Adele, 2017. "Overeducation in Europe: Trends, Convergence and Drivers," IZA Discussion Papers 10678, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10678
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543, December.
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    3. Seamus McGuinness & Konstantinos Pouliakas, 2017. "Deconstructing Theories of Overeducation in Europe: A Wage Decomposition Approach," Research in Labor Economics, in: Solomon W. Polachek & Konstantinos Pouliakas & Giovanni Russo & Konstantinos Tatsiramos (ed.),Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets, volume 45, pages 81-127, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
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    5. Verhaest, D. & van der Velden, R.K.W., 2010. "Cross-country differences in graduate overeducation and its persistence," ROA Research Memorandum 007, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Baran, 2019. "Is expansion of overeducation cohort-driven? Evidence from Poland," Working Papers 2019-13, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    2. Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo Llorente & Sudipa Sarkar & Raquel Sebastian & Jose-Ignacio Antón, 2018. "Educational mismatch in Europe at the turn of the century: Measurement, intensity and evolution," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(8), pages 977-995, November.
    3. Queralt Capsada-Munsech, 2019. "Measuring Overeducation: Incidence, Correlation and Overlaps Across Indicators and Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 145(1), pages 279-301, August.
    4. Redmond, Paul & Whelan, Adele, 2017. "Educational Attainment and Skill Utilization in the Irish Labour Market: An EU Comparison," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    5. Alfano, Vincenzo & D'Uva, Marcella & De Simone, Elina & Gaeta, Giuseppe Lucio, 2019. "Should I stay or should I go? Migration and job-skills mismatch among Italian doctoral recipients," GLO Discussion Paper Series 340, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    6. McQuinn, Kieran & O'Toole, Conor & Economides, Philip & Monteiro, Teresa, 2017. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Winter 2017," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20174.
    7. Marta Palczyñska, 2020. "Overeducation and wages: the role of cognitive skills and personality traits," IBS Working Papers 03/2020, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    dynamic panel data; overeducation;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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