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What's in a Name in a War

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  • Jurajda, Štepán

    (CERGE-EI)

  • Kova?, Dejan

    (CERGE-EI)

Abstract

We propose a novel empirical strategy for identifying and studying nationalism using name choices. We first show that having been given a first name that is synonymous with the leader(s) of the fascist Croatian state during World War II predicts volunteering for army service in the 1991-1995 Croatian war of independence and dying during the conflict. Next, we use the universe of Croatian birth certificates and the information about nationalism conveyed by first names to contrast the evolution of nationalism and its intergenerational transmission across locations affected by extreme war-related experiences. Our evidence suggests that in ex-Yugoslav Croatia, nationalism was on a continuous rise starting in the 1970s, that its rise was curbed in areas where con- centration camps were located during WWII, and that nationalist fathers consider the nationalism-transmission trade-off between within-family and society-wide transmission channels suggested by Bisin and Verdier (2001).

Suggested Citation

  • Jurajda, Štepán & Kova?, Dejan, 2016. "What's in a Name in a War," IZA Discussion Papers 10331, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10331
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    23. Yann Algan & Thierry Mayer & Mathias Thoenig, 2013. "The Economic Incentives of Cultural Transmission: Spatial Evidence from Naming Patterns across France," Working Papers hal-03460909, HAL.
    24. Disdier, Anne-Célia & Head, Keith & Mayer, Thierry, 2010. "Exposure to foreign media and changes in cultural traits: Evidence from naming patterns in France," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 226-238, March.
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    26. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/c8dmi8nm4pdjkuc9g8mcn8chn is not listed on IDEAS
    27. Yann Algan & Clément Malgouyres & Thierry Mayer & Mathias Thoenig, 2022. "The Economic Incentives of Cultural Transmission: Spatial Evidence from Naming Patterns Across France [‘Cultural assimilation during the age of mass migration’]," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 132(642), pages 437-470.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kukic, Leonard, 2019. "The last Yugoslavs: ethnic diversity, national identity and civil war," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 102323, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ustaše; nationalism; names; intergenerational transmission;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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