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Shaping urban traffic patterns through congestion charging: What factors drive success or failure?

  • Daniel Albalate

    ()

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

  • Germa Bel

    ()

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

Congestion costs are emerging as one of the most important challenges faced by metropolitan planners and transport authorities in first world economies. In US these costs were as high as 78 million dollars in 2005 and are growing due to fast increases in travel delays. In order to solve the current and severe levels of congestion the US department of transportation have recently started a program to initiate congestion pricing in five metropolitan areas. In this context it is important to determine those factors helping its implementation and success, but also the problems or difficulties associated with charging projects. In this article we analyze worldwide experiences with urban road charging in order to extract interesting and helpful lessons for policy makers engaged in congestion pricing projects and for those interested in the introduction of traffic management tools to regulate the entrance to big cities.

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File URL: http://www.ub.edu/irea/working_papers/2008/200801.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics in its series IREA Working Papers with number 200801.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2008
Date of revision: Jan 2008
Handle: RePEc:ira:wpaper:200801
Contact details of provider: Postal: Tinent Coronel Valenzuela, Num 1-11 08034 Barcelona
Web page: http://www.ub.edu/irea/

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  1. Viegas, José M., 2001. "Making urban road pricing acceptable and effective: searching for quality and equity in urban mobility," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 289-294, October.
  2. Odd I. Larsen & Knut �stmoe, 2001. "The Experience of Urban Toll Cordons in Norway: Lessons for the Future," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, London School of Economics and University of Bath, vol. 35(3), pages 457-471, September.
  3. Eliasson, Jonas & Mattsson, Lars-Göran, 2006. "Equity effects of congestion pricing: Quantitative methodology and a case study for Stockholm," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(7), pages 602-620, August.
  4. Parry, I. W. H., 2002. "Comparing the efficiency of alternative policies for reducing traffic congestion," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(3), pages 333-362, September.
  5. Richard Arnott & Andre de Palma & Robin Lindsey, 1993. "The Welfare Effects Of Congestion Tolls With Heterogeneous Commuters," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 231, Boston College Department of Economics.
  6. Krupnick, Alan & Harrington, Winston & Alberini, Anna, 1998. "Overcoming Public Aversion to Congestion Pricing," Discussion Papers dp-98-27, Resources For the Future.
  7. Amihai Glazer & Esko Niskanen, 2000. "Which Consumers Benefit from Congestion Tolls?," Discussion Papers 216, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  8. S. Jaensirisak & M. Wardman & A. D. May, 2005. "Explaining Variations in Public Acceptability of Road Pricing Schemes," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, London School of Economics and University of Bath, vol. 39(2), pages 127-154, May.
  9. Winston, Clifford & Langer, Ashley, 2006. "The effect of government highway spending on road users' congestion costs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 463-483, November.
  10. Jonathan Leape, 2006. "The London Congestion Charge," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 157-176, Fall.
  11. Mohammed A. Quddus & Alon Carmel & Michael G. H. Bell, 2007. "The Impact of the Congestion Charge on Retail: the London Experience," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, London School of Economics and University of Bath, vol. 41(1), pages 113-133, January.
  12. Charles Raux & Stéphanie Souche, 2004. "The Acceptability of Urban Road Pricing: A Theoretical Analysis Applied to Experience in Lyon," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, London School of Economics and University of Bath, vol. 38(2), pages 191-215, May.
  13. McQuaid, Ronald & Grieco, Margaret, 2005. "Edinburgh and the politics of congestion charging: Negotiating road user charging with affected publics," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(5), pages 475-476, September.
  14. Olszewski, Piotr & Xie, Litian, 2005. "Modelling the effects of road pricing on traffic in Singapore," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(7-9), pages 755-772.
  15. Gregory B. Christainsen, 2006. "Road Pricing in Singapore after 30 Years," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 71-88, Winter.
  16. Georgina Santos & Gordon Fraser, 2006. "Road pricing: lessons from London," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 21(46), pages 263-310, 04.
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