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No need for more time: Intertemporal allocation decisions under time pressure

Listed author(s):
  • Florian Lindner

    ()

  • Julia Rose

    ()

Time preferences drive decisions in many economic contexts. For understanding the underlying decision process, it is key to identify what aspects these preferences in different situations. To shed light on how people make intertemporal allocation choices, we analyze the stability of time preferences under time pressure. Conducting a laboratory study with 144 subjects using convex time budgets, we elicit time preferences with and without time pressure in a within-subject design. We find preferences to be stable across conditions for aggregate estimates of present-bias and utility function curvature. For standard discounting, we find subjects to be significantly less impatient under time pressure. All results hold across specifications and different sub-samples. Individual-level analyses confirm aggregate findings.

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File URL: http://eeecon.uibk.ac.at/wopec2/repec/inn/wpaper/2016-24.pdf
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Paper provided by Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck in its series Working Papers with number 2016-24.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2016
Handle: RePEc:inn:wpaper:2016-24
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