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Some Lessons for Fiscal Policy from the Financial Crisis

  • Philip Lane

    ()

    (Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College Dublin)

The current crisis calls for a re-assessment of the optimal conduct of macroeconomic policies during non-crisis normal times. In particular, the risk and costs of crises can be mitigated by macroeconomic policies that lean against the wind in the face of cyclical, sectoral and external shocks. In this paper, I discuss the challenges involved in deploying fiscal policy in pursuit of a broad definition of macroeconomic stabilisation. The main policy conclusion is that pro-stabilisation fiscal policies are likely to be more effective if fiscal policy is determined under a formal fiscal framework that combines a set of fiscal rules and a substantive role for an independent fiscal policy council.

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Paper provided by IIIS in its series The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series with number iiisdp334.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp334
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  1. Carlo Favero & Francesco Giavazzi, 2007. "Debt and the effects of fiscal policy," Working Papers 07-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  2. Woo, Jaejoon, 2003. "Economic, political, and institutional determinants of public deficits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3-4), pages 387-426, March.
  3. Addison-Smyth, Diarmaid & McQuinn, Kieran & O' Reilly, Gerard, 2009. "Quantifying Revenue Windfalls from the Irish Housing Market," Research Technical Papers 10/RT/09, Central Bank of Ireland.
  4. James Feyrer & Jay C. Shambaugh, 2009. "Global Savings and Global Investment: The Transmission of Identified Fiscal Shocks," NBER Working Papers 15113, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Galstyan, Vahagn A. & Lane, Philip R., 2008. "The Composition of Government Spending and the Real Exchange Rate," CEPR Discussion Papers 6903, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Antonio Spilimbergo & Steve Symansky & Olivier Blanchard & Carlo Cottarelli, 2009. "Fiscal Policy For The Crisis," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 10(2), pages 26-32, 07.
  7. Alberto Alesina & Guido Tabellini, 2005. "Why is Fiscal Policy Often Procyclical?," NBER Working Papers 11600, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Agustin S. Benetrix & Philip R. Lane, 2009. "Fiscal Shocks and The Sectoral Composition of Output," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp294, IIIS.
  9. Xavier Debrun & Manmohan S. Kumar, 2007. "The Discipline-Enhancing Role of Fiscal Institutions: Theory and Empirical Evidence," IMF Working Papers 07/171, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Talvi, Ernesto & Vegh, Carlos A., 2005. "Tax base variability and procyclical fiscal policy in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 156-190, October.
  11. Morris, Richard & de Castro Fernández, Francisco & Jonk, Steven & Kremer, Jana & Linehan, Suzanne & Marino, Maria Rosaria & Schalck, Christophe & Tkacevs, Olegs, 2009. "Explaining government revenue windfalls and shortfalls: an analysis for selected EU countries," Working Paper Series 1114, European Central Bank.
  12. Beetsma, Roel & Giuliodori, Massimo & Wierts, Peter, 2009. "Budgeting versus implementing fiscal policy in the EU," CEPR Discussion Papers 7285, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Ffrench-Davis Ricardo, 2010. "Latin America: The Structural Fiscal Balance Policy in Chile: A Move Toward Counter-Cyclical Macroeconomics," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-16, January.
  14. Bénétrix, Agustín S. & Lane, Philip R., 2013. "Fiscal cyclicality and EMU," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 164-176.
  15. Giancarlo Corsetti & Gernot J. Mueller, 2007. "Twin Deficits, Openness and the Business Cycle," Economics Working Papers ECO2007/20, European University Institute.
  16. Katrin Assenmacher-Wesche & Stefan Gerlach, 2010. "Monetary policy and financial imbalances: facts and fiction," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 25, pages 437-482, 07.
  17. Felix Eschenbach & Ludger Schuknecht, 2004. "Budgetary risks from real estate and stock markets," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 19(39), pages 313-346, 07.
  18. Nathalie Girouard & Robert W.R. Price, 2004. "Asset Price Cycles, “One-Off” Factors and Structural Budget Balances," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 391, OECD Publishing.
  19. Gylfason, Thorvaldur & Holmström, Bengt & Korkman, Sixten & Söderström, Hans Tson & Vihriälä, Vesa, . "Nordics in Global Crisis. Vulnerability and resilience," ETLA B, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy, number 242, June.
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