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Job Flows and Plant Size Dynamics: Traditional Measures and Alternative Econometric Techniques

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  • Pietro Garibaldi

Abstract

This paper measures the relation between job flows and stablishment size applying econometric techniques best suited for analysing the dynamics of large cross-section. Using a balanced panel from the Mexican Manufacturing sector, it shows that, in line with cross-country evidence, initially small firms create proportionally more jobs than large firms. Since these results suffer from regression toward the mean, the paper applies an alternative technique and it does not find long-run tendency of small establishment to converge toward the mean. Furthermore, it shows how cross-sectional dynamics varies across industries and how it is linked to gross and net flows in each sector. We observe convergence to the mean in relatively stable sectors and asymmetric dynamic behaviour between expanding and declining industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Pietro Garibaldi, "undated". "Job Flows and Plant Size Dynamics: Traditional Measures and Alternative Econometric Techniques," Working Papers 99, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:igi:igierp:99
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Empirical cross-section dynamics in economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 426-434, April.
    2. Evans, David S, 1987. "Tests of Alternative Theories of Firm Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(4), pages 657-674, August.
    3. Quah, Danny, 1994. "Convergence Empirics Across Economies with (Some) Capital Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 954, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1990. "Gross Job Creation and Destruction: Microeconomic Evidence and Macroeconomic Implications," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1990, Volume 5, pages 123-186 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Friedman, Milton, 1992. "Do Old Fallacies Ever Die?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 2129-2132, December.
    6. R Koopmans & A Lamo, 1995. "Cross-Sectional Firm Dynamics: Theory and Empirical Results from the Chemical Sector," CEP Discussion Papers dp0229, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Geweke, John & Marshall, Robert C & Zarkin, Gary A, 1986. "Mobility Indices in Continuous Time Markov Chains," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(6), pages 1407-1423, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin-Barroso, David & Nuñez-Serrano, Juan Andres & Turrion, Jaime & Velazquez, Francisco J., 2011. "The European Map of Job Flows," MPRA Paper 33602, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.

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