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Differential mortality in the UK

Author

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  • Orazio Attanasio

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London)

  • Carl Emmerson

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

Abstract

In this paper we use the two waves of the British Retirement Survey (1988/89 and 1994) to quantify the relationship between socio-economic status and health outcomes. We find that, even after conditioning on the initial health status, wealth rankings are important determinants of mortality and the evolution of the health indicator in the survey. For men aged 65 moving from the 40th percentile to the 60th percentile in the wealth distribution increases the probability of survival by between 2.4 and 3.4 percentage points depending on the measure of wealth used. A slightly smaller effect is found for women of between 1.5 and 1.9 percentage points. In the process of estimating these effects we control for non-random attrition from our sample. British welfare reform debate in recent years. This debate is informed by tax-benefit modelling, yet accurate modelling of Family Credit is fraught with potential problems. The main model input data are found to under-sample Family Credit recipients considerably, but those who it does sample seem representative of the Family Credit recipient population. Substantial mismatch is found between those reporting Family Credit receipt and those modelled as en Titled. We show that regression techniques can be used to adjust model results for the fact of non take-up, but that data constraints leave no obvious way to deal with the equally significant problem of famlies who receive benefit but are not modelled as en titled. The difficulties posed by the input data's under-sampling and by the significant number of claimants without modelled en Titlement lead us finally to consider the use (and the limitations) of calibrating results.

Suggested Citation

  • Orazio Attanasio & Carl Emmerson, 2001. "Differential mortality in the UK," IFS Working Papers W01/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:01/16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard Disney & Paul Johnson & Gary Stears, 1998. "Asset wealth and asset decumulation among households in the Retirement Survey," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 19(2), pages 153-174, May.
    2. Angus S. Deaton & Christina Paxson, 2001. "Mortality, Education, Income, and Inequality among American Cohorts," NBER Chapters,in: Themes in the Economics of Aging, pages 129-170 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Angus Deaton, 1999. "Inequalities in Income and Inequalities in Health," NBER Working Papers 7141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
    5. Michael D. Hurd & Daniel McFadden & Angela Merrill, 2001. "Predictors of Mortality among the Elderly," NBER Chapters,in: Themes in the Economics of Aging, pages 171-198 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Orazio P. Attanasio & Hilary Williamson Hoynes, 2000. "Differential Mortality and Wealth Accumulation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(1), pages 1-29.
    7. Shorrocks, A F, 1975. "The Age-Wealth Relationship: A Cross-Section and Cohort Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(2), pages 155-163, May.
    8. James Banks & Richard Blundell & James Smith, 2000. "Wealth inequality in the United States and Great Britain," IFS Working Papers W00/20, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cem Mete, 2005. "Predictors of elderly mortality:health status, socioeconomic characteristics and social determinants of health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(2), pages 135-148.
    2. Kopczuk, Wojciech & Saez, Emmanuel, 2004. "Top Wealth Shares in the United States, 1916-2000: Evidence From Estate Tax Returns," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 57(2), pages 445-487, June.
    3. Maarten Lindeboom & France Portrait & Gerard J. van den Berg, 2003. "Individual Mortality and Macro Economic Conditions from Birth to Death," CEIS Research Paper 42, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
    4. Rainald Borck, 2007. "Voting, Inequality And Redistribution," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 90-109, February.
    5. Rainald Borck, 2007. "On the Choice of Public Pensions when Income and Life Expectancy Are Correlated," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 9(4), pages 711-725, August.
    6. Bérangère Legendre, 2011. "La croissance du revenu des retraités en Europe peut-elle être considérée comme pro-pauvres ?," Post-Print hal-00951721, HAL.
    7. Cem Mete & T. Paul Schultz, 2002. "Health and Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Taiwan," Working Papers 846, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    8. Gardner, Jonathan & Oswald, Andrew, 2004. "How is mortality affected by money, marriage, and stress?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1181-1207, November.
    9. Meer, Jonathan & Miller, Douglas L. & Rosen, Harvey S., 2003. "Exploring the health-wealth nexus," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 713-730, September.
    10. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Lindeboom, Maarten & Portrait, France, 2011. "Conjugal bereavement effects on health and mortality at advanced ages," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 774-794, July.
    11. Aggarwal, Raj & Goodell, John W., 2013. "Political-economy of pension plans: Impact of institutions, gender, and culture," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1860-1879.
    12. Juan Miguel Gallego & Manuel Ramírez Gómez & Carlos Sepúlveda, 2005. "The Determinants of The Health Status in a Developing Country: results from the Colombian Case," Lecturas de Economía, Universidad de Antioquia, Departamento de Economía, issue 63, pages 111-135, Julio-Dic.
    13. James M. Poterba, 2001. "Annuity markets and retirement security," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 22(3), pages 249-270., September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • H8 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health

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