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Einkommen und Sterblichkeit in Deutschland: Leben Reiche länger?

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  • Reil-Held, Anette

    () (Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging (MEA) and Sonderforschungsbereich 504)

Abstract

Differential mortality by income has been found in many countries. These differences in life expectancy are important from a political and an empirical point of view. Because poorer pensioners tend to receive pension benefits for a shorter period of time redistribution towards richer pensioners occurs in the pension system. Furthermore, differential mortality must be considered when interpreting empirical data about income or savings of the elderly. Based on the German Socio-Economic Panel, this paper finds a correlation between income and mortality for people aged 50 and above in Germany, too. Men and Women in the lowest quartile of the income distribution can expect to live 6, respectively 4 years less than men and women in the upper quartile. The positive correlation between income and life expectancy can be shown even when controlling for additional socio-demographic characteristics like schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Reil-Held, Anette, 2000. "Einkommen und Sterblichkeit in Deutschland: Leben Reiche länger?," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 00-14, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
  • Handle: RePEc:xrs:sfbmaa:00-14
    Note: Financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, SFB 504, at the University of Mannheim, is gratefully acknowledged.
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    File URL: http://www.sfb504.uni-mannheim.de/publications/dp00-14.pdf
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    1. Angus S. Deaton & Christina Paxson, 2001. "Mortality, Education, Income, and Inequality among American Cohorts," NBER Chapters,in: Themes in the Economics of Aging, pages 129-170 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Garrett, Daniel M, 1995. "The Effects of Differential Mortality Rates on the Progressivity of Social Security," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(3), pages 457-475, July.
    3. Orazio P. Attanasio & Hilary Williamson Hoynes, 2000. "Differential Mortality and Wealth Accumulation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(1), pages 1-29.
    4. Nancy Jianakoplos & Paul Menchik & Owen Irvine, 1989. "Using Panel Data to Assess the Bias in Cross-sectional Inferences of Life-Cycle Changes in the Level and Composition of Household Wealth," NBER Chapters,in: The Measurement of Saving, Investment, and Wealth, pages 553-644 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Axel Boersch-Supan, 1999. "Incentive Effects of Social Security Under an Uncertain Disability Option," NBER Working Papers 7339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hans-Martin von Gaudecker & Rembrandt D. Scholz, 2006. "Lifetime earnings and life expectancy," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Tim Krieger & Stefan Traub, 2008. "Back to Bismarck? Shifting Preferences for Intragenerational Redistribution in OECD Pension Systems," Working Papers CIE 13, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    3. Rainald Borck, 2007. "On the Choice of Public Pensions when Income and Life Expectancy Are Correlated," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 9(4), pages 711-725, August.
    4. Helmuth Cremer & Philippe Donder, 2016. "Life Expectancy Heterogeneity and the Political Support for Collective Annuities," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 118(3), pages 594-615, July.
    5. Richard Hauser & Holger Stein, 2004. "Inequality of the Distribution of Personal Wealth in Germany 1973-1998," Microeconomics 0401005, EconWPA.
    6. Hans-Martin von Gaudecker & Rembrandt D. Scholz, 2007. "Differential mortality by lifetime earnings in Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(4), pages 83-108, August.
    7. Ehrentraut, Oliver & Raffelhüschen, Bernd, 2008. "Demografischer Wandel und Betriebsrenten: Zur Berücksichtigung der Langlebigkeit bei der Anpassung von Direktzusagen," FZG Discussion Papers 25, University of Freiburg, Research Center for Generational Contracts (FZG).
    8. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Essig, Lothar, 2005. "Personal assets and pension reform : how well prepared are the Germans?," Papers 05-19, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    9. Busl, Claudia & Iliewa, Zwetelina & Jokisch, Sabine & Kappler, Marcus & Roscher, Thomas & Schindler, Felix & Schleer, Frauke, 2012. "Endbericht an das Bundesministerium der Finanzen zum Forschungsauftrag fe 11/11: "Sparen und Investieren vor dem Hintergrund des demografischen Wandels"," ZEW Expertises, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research, number 110554.

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