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Einkommen und Sterblichkeit in Deutschland: Leben Reiche länger?

  • Reil-Held, Anette

    ()

    (Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging (MEA) and Sonderforschungsbereich 504)

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    Differential mortality by income has been found in many countries. These differences in life expectancy are important from a political and an empirical point of view. Because poorer pensioners tend to receive pension benefits for a shorter period of time redistribution towards richer pensioners occurs in the pension system. Furthermore, differential mortality must be considered when interpreting empirical data about income or savings of the elderly. Based on the German Socio-Economic Panel, this paper finds a correlation between income and mortality for people aged 50 and above in Germany, too. Men and Women in the lowest quartile of the income distribution can expect to live 6, respectively 4 years less than men and women in the upper quartile. The positive correlation between income and life expectancy can be shown even when controlling for additional socio-demographic characteristics like schooling.

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    Paper provided by Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim & Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim in its series Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications with number 00-14.

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    Length: 28 pages
    Date of creation: 16 Apr 2000
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:xrs:sfbmaa:00-14
    Note: Financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, SFB 504, at the University of Mannheim, is gratefully acknowledged.
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    1. Orazio P. Attanasio & Hilary Williamson Hoynes, 2000. "Differential Mortality and Wealth Accumulation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(1), pages 1-29.
    2. Garrett, Daniel M, 1995. "The Effects of Differential Mortality Rates on the Progressivity of Social Security," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(3), pages 457-75, July.
    3. Angus Deaton & Christina Paxson, 1999. "Mortality, Education, Income, and Inequality among American Cohorts," NBER Working Papers 7140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Nancy Jianakoplos & Paul Menchik & Owen Irvine, 1989. "Using Panel Data to Assess the Bias in Cross-sectional Inferences of Life-Cycle Changes in the Level and Composition of Household Wealth," NBER Chapters, in: The Measurement of Saving, Investment, and Wealth, pages 553-644 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Axel Boersch-Supan, 1999. "Incentive Effects of Social Security Under an Uncertain Disability Option," NBER Working Papers 7339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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