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Predictors of elderly mortality:health status, socioeconomic characteristics and social determinants of health

  • Cem Mete

    (The World Bank, Washington, DC, USA)

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This paper uses longitudinal survey data from Taiwan to investigate the predictors of elderly mortality. The empirical analysis confirms a relationship between socioeconomic characteristics and mortality, but this relationship weakens considerably when estimates are conditional on the health status at the time of the first wave survey. In terms of predictive power, the models with an activities of daily living index fare better (as opposed to models with self-evaluated health or self-reported illnesses). Having said that there is a payoff to the consideration of self-evaluated health jointly with other 'objective' health indicators. Other findings include a strong association between life satisfaction and survival, which prevails even after controlling for other explanatory variables. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.892
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 14 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 135-148

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:14:y:2005:i:2:p:135-148
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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  1. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
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  10. Zachary Zimmer & Xian Liu & Albert Hermalin & Yi-Li Chuang, 1998. "Educational attainment and transitions in functional status among older Taiwanese," Demography, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 361-375, August.
  11. Novo, Mehmed & Hammarström, Anne & Janlert, Urban, 2001. "Do high levels of unemployment influence the health of those who are not unemployed? A gendered comparison of young men and women during boom and recession," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 293-303, August.
  12. Waldron, Ingrid, 1993. "Recent trends in sex mortality ratios for adults in developed countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 451-462, February.
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  14. Lee Lillard & Constantijn Panis, 1996. "Marital status and mortality: The role of health," Demography, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 313-327, August.
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