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Gender wage gap in transistion in Vietnam

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  • Amy Y.C. Liu

Abstract

The impact of sectoral location on the gender earnings gap is important in the context of Vietnam’s transition into a market-oriented economy. More and more women are seeking employment in the private sector either in response to retrenchment in the public sector or in response to increasing economic opportunities in the private sector. We apply the Appleton et al. (1999) decomposition technique to the Vietnam Living Standards Survey data collected in 1992- 93 and 1997-98, to decompose the gender earnings gap into within sector and between-sector differences. It has found that sectoral location has become more important in 1997-98 and that the changes have had an adverse impact on the gender gap. To further examine the results, conventional decomposition methods are used on different sectors. Three main conclusions are drawn. First, the absolute gender earnings gap has risen over time in the private sector. Second, discrimination has increasingly accounted for more of the gender earnings differences in the private sector over time. Third, discrimination accounts for more of the gap in the private sector than in SOEs in 1997-98 than in 1992-93.

Suggested Citation

  • Amy Y.C. Liu, 2001. "Gender wage gap in transistion in Vietnam," International and Development Economics Working Papers idec01-3, International and Development Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:idc:wpaper:idec01-3
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    File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/degrees/idec/working_papers/IDEC01-3.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Haughton, Dominique & Haughton, Jonathan, 1997. "Explaining Child Nutrition in Vietnam," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(3), pages 541-556, April.
    2. Bob Gregory, 1999. "Labour Market Institutions and the Gender Pay Ratio," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(3), pages 273-278.
    3. Appleton, Simon & Hoddinott, John & Krishnan, Pramila, 1999. "The Gender Wage Gap in Three African Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(2), pages 289-312, January.
    4. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1996. "Wage Structure and Gender Earnings Differentials: An International Comparison," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages 29-62, Suppl..
    5. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Winners and Losers in Russia's Economic Transition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1094-1116, December.
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    7. Randall S. Brown & Marilyn Moon & Barbara S. Zoloth, 1980. "Incorporating Occupational Attainment in Studies of Male-Female Earnings Differentials," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 15(1), pages 3-28.
    8. David Neumark, 1988. "Employers' Discriminatory Behavior and the Estimation of Wage Discrimination," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(3), pages 279-295.
    9. Barrett, Garry F, 2002. "The Effect of Alcohol Consumption on Earnings," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(240), pages 79-96, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kang, Woojin & Imai, Katsushi S., 2012. "Pro-poor growth, poverty and inequality in rural Vietnam," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 527-539.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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