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Regional Financial Development and Firm Growth in Peru

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  • Eduardo Moron
  • Edgar Salgado
  • Cristhian Seminario

Abstract

This paper documents the relationship between regional financial development and firm growth in the Peruvian manufacturing sector. In order to control for mutual causality between credit availability and firm growth, industry differences in financial dependence on external funds are exploited. The 1994 and 2008 rounds of the National Economic Census are used, permitting analysis at the firm level as well as the activity level. Results suggest a significant and positive effect of financial deepening on surviving firms` growth. However, this effect is smaller for micro enterprises, suggesting that the cost of external funding decreases with financial development mainly for large firms. The conclusions remain unchanged when entering and exiting firms are included. The paper further finds that credit expansion have encouraged not only firm growth but also firm entry. The results are robust using an alternative measure of financial dependence.

Suggested Citation

  • Eduardo Moron & Edgar Salgado & Cristhian Seminario, 2013. "Regional Financial Development and Firm Growth in Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-398, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:idb-wp-398
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    2. Catão, Luis A. V. & Pagés, Carmen & Rosales, Maria Fernanda, 2009. "Financial Dependence, Formal Credit, and Informal Jobs: New Evidence from Brazilian Household Data," IZA Discussion Papers 4609, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Daniel Paravisini & Veronica Rappoport & Philipp Schnabl & Daniel Wolfenzon, 2015. "Dissecting the Effect of Credit Supply on Trade: Evidence from Matched Credit-Export Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 333-359.
    4. Juan Carluccio & Thibault Fally, 2012. "Global Sourcing under Imperfect Capital Markets," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(3), pages 740-763, August.
    5. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    6. Eduardo Morón & Edgar Salgado & Cristhian Seminario, 2012. "Financial Dependence, Formal Credit and Firm Informality: Evidence from Peruvian Household Data," Research Department Publications 4776, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    7. Eduardo Morón & Edgar Salgado & Cristhian Seminario, 2012. "Financial Dependence, Formal Credit and Firm Informality: Evidence from Peruvian Household Data," Research Department Publications 4776, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    8. Manova, Kalina, 2008. "Credit constraints, equity market liberalizations and international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 33-47, September.
    9. Catão, Luis A. V. & Pagés, Carmen & Rosales, Maria Fernanda, 2009. "Financial Dependence, Formal Credit, and Informal Jobs: New Evidence from Brazilian Household Data," IZA Discussion Papers 4609, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Moulton, Brent R, 1990. "An Illustration of a Pitfall in Estimating the Effects of Aggregate Variables on Micro Unit," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 334-338, May.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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