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Productive Development Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Case of Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Veronica Baz
  • Maria Cristina Capelo
  • Rodrigo Centeno
  • Ricardo Estrada

Abstract

While Mexico has potential to grow rapidly, its economic growth has remained low for the past three decades. There is no consensus on the country’s development path or on how to achieve specific goals. Since the policy debate remains ideological and lacks pragmatism, productive development policies (PDPs) are often uncoordinated, redundant or even incongruent with each other. It is therefore important to understand the process whereby PDPs are designed and the institutional setting in which they are are implemented. This paper consequently examines whether PDPs respond to market failures and/or government failures. When PDPs are not designed to address specific market failures they can produce unwanted results or prove completely ineffective. When PDPs do address government failures, it is important to determine the reasons why the failure cannot be corrected in the first place and whether PDPs will be effective at addressing the problem in a second-best manner.

Suggested Citation

  • Veronica Baz & Maria Cristina Capelo & Rodrigo Centeno & Ricardo Estrada, 2010. "Productive Development Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Case of Mexico," Research Department Publications 4693, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4693
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pablo T. Spiller & Ernesto H. Stein & Mariano Tommasi & Carlos Scartascini & Lee J. Alston & Marcus André Melo & Bernardo Mueller & Carlos Pereira & Cristóbal Aninat & John Londregan & Patricio Navia , 2008. "Policymaking in Latin America: How Politics Shapes Policies," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 40178 edited by Ernesto H. Stein & Mariano Tommasi & Pablo T. Spiller & Carlos Scartascini, February.
    2. Markus Balzat & Andreas Pyka, 2005. "Mapping National Innovation Systems in the OECD Area," Discussion Paper Series 279, Universitaet Augsburg, Institute for Economics.
    3. Heckman, James J., 2000. "Policies to foster human capital," Research in Economics, Elsevier, pages 3-56.
    4. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1999. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labour Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 112-142, February.
    5. repec:idb:idbbks:329 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Hausmann, Ricardo & Rodrik, Dani, 2003. "Economic development as self-discovery," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 603-633.
    7. Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji, 2005. "Systems of Innovation and Underdevelopment: An Institutional Perspective," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 01, United Nations University - INTECH.
    8. James Heckman, 2011. "Policies to foster human capital," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 3, pages 73-137.
    9. repec:idb:brikps:40178 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Intarakumnerd, Patarapong & Chairatana, Pun-arj & Tangchitpiboon, Tipawan, 2002. "National innovation system in less successful developing countries: the case of Thailand," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 1445-1457.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peres, Wilson, 2011. "Industrial Policies in Latin America," WIDER Working Paper Series 048, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial Policy; Institutions; Policymaking; Mexico;

    JEL classification:

    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

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