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Industrial Policies in Latin America

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  • Peres, Wilson

Abstract

This chapter analyses the main features of industrial policies carried out in Latin America since 1990. It studies these policies during import substitution industrialization and how they changed after the market-oriented economic reforms. It presents the main national strategies, policy lines and instruments designed in the region, as well as the return of sectoral policies to the public agenda. Special attention is paid to Brazilian industrial policies because they represent the most advanced experience in the region. The paper underscores that progress in policy design has out paced improvements in policy implementation and evaluation, and discusses the importance of sector targeting, endogenous capabilities, institutions, and political will for industrial policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Peres, Wilson, 2011. "Industrial Policies in Latin America," WIDER Working Paper Series 048, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2011-48
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    File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2011-048.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peres Núñez, Wilson, 1993. "Industrial policy: where do we stand?," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), December.
    2. Veronica Baz & Maria Cristina Capelo & Rodrigo Centeno & Ricardo Estrada, 2010. "Productive Development Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Case of Mexico," Research Department Publications 4693, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Suzigan, Wilson & Furtado, João, 2006. "Industrial policy and development," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    4. Hausmann, Ricardo & Rodrik, Dani, 2003. "Economic development as self-discovery," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 603-633, December.
    5. Veronica Baz & Maria Cristina Capelo & Rodrigo Centeno & Ricardo Estrada, 2010. "Productive Development Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Case of Mexico," Research Department Publications 4693, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cornel Ban, 2013. "Brazil's liberal neo-developmentalism: New paradigm or edited orthodoxy?," Review of International Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 298-331, April.
    2. Seguino, Stephanie & Braunstein, Elissa, 2012. "The impact of economic policy and structural change on gender employment inequality in Latin America, 1990-2010," MPRA Paper 43261, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Paus, Eva, 2014. "Latin America and the middle-income trap," Financiamiento para el Desarrollo 250, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    industrial policy; clusters; policy implementation; Latin America; Brazil; implementation failures.;

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