IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ibt/wpaper/wp032017.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Measuring skills mismatches revisited – introducing sectoral approach

Author

Listed:
  • Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak
  • Andrzej Zurawski

Abstract

Appropriate measuring of skills mismatches is necessary to create an adequate policy response. We analyse the existing evidence, in particular in large scale international surveys: Survey of Skills (PIAAC) and European Skills and Jobs Survey (ESJ). We find out that national, occupational and sectoral differences in the scale of the skills mismatch in Europe are equally important. We identified two main weaknesses of approaches to measuring skills mismatches: subjectivity of answers leading to incomparability of results from different data sets and heterogeneity in particular in sectoral and occupational characteristics, that appear to be more important than cross-national differences. We propose a potential methodological advancement in measuring skills based on defining core knowledge, skills and competencies at the sectoral level with the use of sectoral qualifications frameworks. We assess the usefulness of this approach in measuring the level of skills mismatch.

Suggested Citation

  • Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Andrzej Zurawski, 2017. "Measuring skills mismatches revisited – introducing sectoral approach," IBS Working Papers 03/2017, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibt:wpaper:wp032017
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ibs.org.pl/app/uploads/2017/04/IBS_WP_03_2017.pdf
    File Function: English Version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kampelmann, Stephan & Rycx, François, 2012. "The impact of educational mismatch on firm productivity: Evidence from linked panel data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 918-931.
    2. Allen, Jim & van der Velden, Rolf, 2001. "Educational Mismatches versus Skill Mismatches: Effects on Wages, Job Satisfaction, and On-the-Job Search," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 434-452, July.
    3. Bauer, Thomas K., 2002. "Educational mismatch and wages: a panel analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 221-229, June.
    4. Kiker, B. F. & Santos, Maria C. & de Oliveira, M. Mendes, 1997. "Overeducation and undereducation: Evidence for Portugal," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 111-125, April.
    5. Consoli, Davide & Rentocchini, Francesco, 2015. "A taxonomy of multi-industry labour force skills," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(5), pages 1116-1132.
    6. Schmidt, Peter & Strauss, Robert P, 1975. "The Prediction of Occupation Using Multiple Logit Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 16(2), pages 471-486, June.
    7. Hanol Lee & Jong‐Wha Lee & Eunbi Song, 2016. "Effects of Educational Mistmatch on Wages in the Korean Labor Market," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 375-400, December.
    8. Leszek Wincenciak, 2016. "Educational mismatches and earnings: are the graduates more penalized for being overeducated?," Working Papers 2016-28, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    9. Sicherman, Nachum, 1991. ""Overeducation" in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 101-122, April.
    10. Raufhon Salahodjaev, 2015. "Is more always good? Over-education, job satisfaction and wages on the Czech labor market," Society and Economy, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 37(3), pages 403-414, September.
    11. Peter J. Sloane & Kostas Mavromaras, 2020. "Overeducation, skill mismatches, and labor market outcomes for college graduates," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-88, May.
    12. Leonardo Grilli & Carla Rampichini, 2007. "A multilevel multinomial logit model for the analysis of graduates’ skills," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 16(3), pages 381-393, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Prateek Kukreja, 2019. "Skill Mismatch and Returns to Education in Manufacturing: A Case of India’s Textile and Clothing Industry," Working Papers id:13003, eSocialSciences.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    skills mismatch; skills need; sectoral qualifications frameworks;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ibt:wpaper:wp032017. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (IBS). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ibswapl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.