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The Changing Distribution of Working Hours in Australia


  • Mark Wooden

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Robert Drago

    (Pennsylvania State University, USA)


This paper presents statistical evidence on the nature of working time arrangements in Australia, and especially their distribution. More specifically, the paper analyses: (i) the distribution of weekly working hours in Australia and how that has changed over time; (ii) the extent of mismatch between usual and preferred hours of work, and the degree of persistence in such mismatch; (iii) annual leave usage and its correlation with weekly hours of work; and (iv) how working time arrangements in Australia compare with that in other industrial nations.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Wooden & Robert Drago, 2007. "The Changing Distribution of Working Hours in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n19, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2007n19

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Burgess, 1998. "Working-Time Patterns And Working-Time Deregulation In Australia," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 17(2), pages 35-47, June.
    2. Robert Drago & Mark Wooden & David Black, 2009. "Long Work Hours: Volunteers and Conscripts," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(3), pages 571-600, September.
    3. MARK WOODEN & ROGER WILKINS & SEAMUS McGUINNESS, 2007. "Minimum Wages And The ‘Working Poor’," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 26(4), pages 295-307, December.
    4. Mark Wooden & Nicole Watson, 2007. "The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 208-231, June.
    5. Peetz, D & Townsend, K & Russell, B & Houghton, C & Allan, C & Fox, A, 2003. "Race against time: Extended hours in Australia," Australian Bulletin of Labour, National Institute of Labour Studies, vol. 29(2), pages 126-142.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2009. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-being," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 147-179, March.
    2. Cai, Lixin & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Oguzoglu, Umut, 2008. "The Effects of Health and Health Shocks on Hours Worked," IZA Discussion Papers 3496, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Robert Dixon & John Freebairn, 2007. "Hours of Work: A Demand Perspective," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1022, The University of Melbourne.

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