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Non-standard work timing: evidence from the Australian Time Use Survey

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  • Danielle Venn

Abstract

Non-standard work is relatively common in Australia, with 63 per cent of weekday workers aged between 20 and 59 years working sometime outside 8am to 6pm. However, only 15 per cent of all working-time takes place outside standard hours. Workers in a range of service and manual industries, such as hospitality, health, mining and manufacturing, have high rates of work at non-standard times. Working long hours or part-time increases the chance of working at non-standard times, and there is some evidence that workers without post-school qualifications, in low-skill occupations and from non- English speaking backgrounds are disproportionately more likely to work at non-standard times.

Suggested Citation

  • Danielle Venn, 2003. "Non-standard work timing: evidence from the Australian Time Use Survey," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 866, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mlb:wpaper:866
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    File URL: http://www.economics.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/wpapers-03/866.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mangan, John & Williams, Christine, 1999. "Casual Employment in Australia: A Further Analysis," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 40-50, March.
    2. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1999. "The Timing of Work over Time," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(452), pages 37-66, January.
    3. John Burgess, 1998. "Working-Time Patterns And Working-Time Deregulation In Australia," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 17(2), pages 35-47, June.
    4. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1996. "Workdays, Workhours, and Work Schedules: Evidence for the United States and Germany," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number www, November.
    5. Dawkins, Peter, 1996. "The Distribution of Work in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 72(218), pages 272-286, September.
    6. Kenyon, Peter & Dawkins, Peter, 1989. "A Time Series Analysis of Labour Absence in Australia," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(2), pages 232-239, May.
    7. Jeffrey Balchin & Mark Wooden, 1995. "Absence Penalties and Work Attendance," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 28(4), pages 43-58.
    8. Iain Campbell & Peter Brosnan, 1999. "Labour Market Deregulation in Australia: The slow combustion approach to workplace change," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 353-394.
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