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Does participating in a panel survey change respondents' labor market behavior?

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  • Bach, Ruben

    (Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany])

  • Eckman, Stephanie

Abstract

"Panel survey participation can bring about unintended changes in respondents' behavior and/or reporting of behavior. Using administrative data linked to a large panel survey, we analyze changes in respondents' labor market behavior. We estimate the causal effect of panel participation on the take-up of federal labor market programs using instrumental variables. Results show that panel survey participation leads to a decrease in respondents' take-up of these measures. These results suggest that panel survey participation not only affects the reporting of behavior, as previous studies have demonstrated, but can also alter respondents' actual behavior." (Author's abstract, IAB-Doku) ((en))

Suggested Citation

  • Bach, Ruben & Eckman, Stephanie, 2017. "Does participating in a panel survey change respondents' labor market behavior?," IAB Discussion Paper 201715, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  • Handle: RePEc:iab:iabdpa:201715
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    File URL: http://doku.iab.de/discussionpapers/2017/dp1517.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hutter, Christian & Weber, Enzo, 2017. "The effects of skill-biased technical change on productivity flattening and hours worked," IAB Discussion Paper 201732, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Francesco Carbonero & Christian Offermanns & Enzo Weber, 2017. "The Trend in Labour Income Share: the Role of Technological Change and Imperfect Labour Markets," Working Papers 173, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    IAB-Haushaltspanel; Teilnehmer; Verhaltensänderung; Erwerbsverhalten; Antwortverhalten; arbeitsmarktpolitische Maßnahme; Arbeitslose;

    JEL classification:

    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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