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Can Early Intervention Improve Maternal Well-being? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

Author

Listed:
  • Orla Doyle

    () (University College Dublin)

  • Liam Delaney

    (Behavioural Science Centre, Stirling Management School, Stirling University)

  • Christine O'Farrelly

    (Centre for Mental Health, Imperial College London)

  • Nick Fitzpatrick

    (UCD Geary Institute for Public Policy, University College Dublin)

  • Michael Daly

    (Behavioural Science Centre, Stirling Management School, Stirling University)

Abstract

This study estimates the effect of a targeted policy intervention on global and experienced measures of maternal well-being. Participants from a disadvantaged community are randomly assigned during pregnancy to an intensive home visiting parenting program or a control group. The intervention has no impact on global well-being as measured by life satisfaction and parenting stress or experienced negative affect using episodic reports derived from the Day Reconstruction Method (DRM). Treatment effects are observed on measures of experienced positive affect from the DRM and a measure of mood yesterday. This suggests that early intervention may produce some improvements in experienced well-being.

Suggested Citation

  • Orla Doyle & Liam Delaney & Christine O'Farrelly & Nick Fitzpatrick & Michael Daly, 2015. "Can Early Intervention Improve Maternal Well-being? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial," Working Papers 2015-015, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2015-015
    Note: ECI
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    File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Doyle_Delaney_OFarrelly_etal_2015_early-int-maternal-well.pdf
    File Function: First version, November, 2015
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    well-being; randomized controlled trial; early intervention;

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General

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