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Disentangling Peer Influence On Multiple Levels


  • Valeria Ivaniushina

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

  • Daniel Alexandrov

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)


In this study we focus on the influence of peers on adolescents academic achievement. Specifically, how the learning motivation of peers is related to a student's school grades. We use multilevel regression to analyze the influence of peers on different levels of social circles: school, class, personal network, and compare the effects of "assigned friends" and "chosen friends". The methods of social network analysis are used to define the personal network of a student in different ways: cliques, complete ego networks, and mutual ego networks. We demonstrate that the model improves considerably when the level of personal networks is included between individual and class levels. The learning motivation of a student's friends (defined as a clique or ego network) has an important influence on the student’s school performance, net of student’s personal characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Valeria Ivaniushina & Daniel Alexandrov, 2014. "Disentangling Peer Influence On Multiple Levels," HSE Working papers WP BRP 43/SOC/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:43/soc/2014

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bramoullé, Yann & Djebbari, Habiba & Fortin, Bernard, 2009. "Identification of peer effects through social networks," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(1), pages 41-55, May.
    2. Fujimoto, Kayo & Wang, Peng & Valente, Thomas W., 2013. "The decomposed affiliation exposure model: A network approach to segregating peer influences from crowds and organized sports," Network Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 154-169, August.
    3. Trogdon, Justin G. & Nonnemaker, James & Pais, Joanne, 2008. "Peer effects in adolescent overweight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1388-1399, September.
    4. Jason Fletcher, 2012. "Peer influences on adolescent alcohol consumption: evidence using an instrumental variables/fixed effect approach," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 1265-1286, October.
    5. Alejandro Gaviria & Steven Raphael, 2001. "School-Based Peer Effects And Juvenile Behavior," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 257-268, May.
    6. Ron W Zimmer & Eugenia F Toma, 2000. "Peer effects in private and public schools across countries," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(1), pages 75-92.
    7. Fryer Jr., Roland G. & Torelli, Paul, 2010. "An empirical analysis of 'acting white'," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(5-6), pages 380-396, June.
    8. Vera Titkova & Valeria Ivaniushina & Daniel Alexandrov, 2013. "Sociometric popularity in a school context," HSE Working papers WP BRP 10/EDU/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
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    More about this item


    social network analysis; schools; peer influence; ego networks; cliques;

    JEL classification:

    • Z - Other Special Topics

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