IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hig/wpaper/159-ec-2017.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Core-Periphery vs Home Market Effect: Trade in the Traditional Sector and the Demand Advantage

Author

Listed:
  • Sergey Kichko

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

We study the role of (i) initial differences in shares of immobile workers between countries which stand for the agglomeration forces, and (ii) positive trade costs in the traditional sector which are related to the dispersion forces, in shaping the spatial pattern of the developed and transition countries. We show that on the trade liberalization path in skill-intensive industries, keeping high trade barriers in less skill-intensive sectors is enough to protect a transition country from de-industrialization. If trade liberalization in a skill-intensive sector is accompanied by decreasing trade barriers in the traditional sector, the developed country has a higher probability to become a Core. When partial agglomeration is stable, it is characterized by the Home Market Eect (HME).

Suggested Citation

  • Sergey Kichko, 2017. "Core-Periphery vs Home Market Effect: Trade in the Traditional Sector and the Demand Advantage," HSE Working papers WP BRP 159/EC/2017, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:159/ec/2017
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://wp.hse.ru/data/2017/03/15/1170146826/159EC2017%20(2).pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tabuchi, Takatoshi & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 2002. "Taste heterogeneity, labor mobility and economic geography," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 155-177, October.
    2. Wolfgang Dauth & Sebastian Findeisen & Jens Suedekum, 2014. "The Rise Of The East And The Far East: German Labor Markets And Trade Integration," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 12(6), pages 1643-1675, December.
    3. Davis, Donald R, 1998. "The Home Market, Trade, and Industrial Structure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1264-1276, December.
    4. David H. Autor & David Dorn & Gordon H. Hanson, 2013. "The China Syndrome: Local Labor Market Effects of Import Competition in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(6), pages 2121-2168, October.
    5. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
    6. Murphy, Kevin M & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1989. "Industrialization and the Big Push," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1003-1026, October.
    7. Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 857-880.
    8. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    9. repec:hhs:iuiwop:430 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Picard, Pierre M. & Zeng, Dao-Zhi, 2005. "Agricultural sector and industrial agglomeration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 75-106, June.
    11. Erhan Artuç & Shubham Chaudhuri & John McLaren, 2010. "Trade Shocks and Labor Adjustment: A Structural Empirical Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 1008-1045, June.
    12. Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano & Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 2006. "The 'genome' of NEG models with vertical linkages: a positive and normative synthesis," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(2), pages 113-139, April.
    13. Rafael Dix‐Carneiro, 2014. "Trade Liberalization and Labor Market Dynamics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(3), pages 825-885, May.
    14. Matthew J. Notowidigdo, 2011. "The Incidence of Local Labor Demand Shocks," NBER Working Papers 17167, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Alexander V. Sidorov & Evgeny Zhelobodko, 2013. "Agglomeration and Spreading in an Asymmetric World," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(2), pages 201-219, May.
    16. Jens Suedekum, 2006. "Agglomeration And Regional Costs Of Living," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 529-543.
    17. Liliana Garrido-da-Silva & Sofia B. S. D. Castro & Paulo B. Vasconcelos, 2015. "Discrete Dynamics for the Core-periphery Model," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 36-51, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Core-Periphery model; partial agglomeration; Home Market Eect; mo- nopolistic competition;

    JEL classification:

    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:159/ec/2017. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamil Abdulaev) or (Victoria Elkina). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/hsecoru.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.