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Contribution of ICT to the Chinese Economic Growth

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Abstract

The view about systematic irrationality of investors and managers in investment with reference to information and communication technology (ICT) with no effects on productivity growth is called productivity paradox. Research suggests that ICT return in developed nations is significant and positive, but not in developing countries. This paper challenges the above conclusion by examining the contribution of ICT to the Chinese economic growth. We investigate the relationship between TFP growth and ICT capital and provide estimation of the returns to ICT investment. The contribution of ICT to economic growth has not been studied earlier for the developing countries like China. The empirical results suggest that China has reaped the benefits of ICT investment. The policy implications for the Chinese ICT investment and development are also discussed. The results add to our understanding of how ICT affects growth in the context of economic development.

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  • Heshmati, Almas & Yang, Wanshan, 2006. "Contribution of ICT to the Chinese Economic Growth," Ratio Working Papers 91, The Ratio Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0091
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    1. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
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    3. Zuliu F. Hu & Mohsin S. Khan, 1997. "Why Is China Growing So Fast?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 44(1), pages 103-131, March.
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    6. Dale W. Jorgenson & Mun S. Ho & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2006. "Projecting Productivity Growth: Lessons from the US Growth Resurgence," Chapters,in: The New Economy and Beyond, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Joseph, K.J., 2002. "Growth of ICT and ICT for Development: Realities of the Myths of the Indian Experience," WIDER Working Paper Series 078, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Meng, Qingxuan & Li, Mingzhi, 2002. "New Economy and ICT development in China," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 275-295, June.
    9. Oliner, Stephen D. & Sichel, Daniel E., 2003. "Information technology and productivity: where are we now and where are we going?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 477-503, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Krume Nikoloski & Vlatko Paceskoski, 2015. "Contemporary Trends In The World Trade," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 6, pages 21-26, December.
    2. Almas Heshmati & Biwei Su, 2013. "Development and Sources of Labor Productivity in Chinese Provinces," China Economic Policy Review (CEPR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 2(02), pages 1-30.
    3. Shiu, Alice & Heshmati, Almas, 2006. "Technical Change and Total Factor Productivity Growth for Chinese Provinces: A Panel Data Analysis," Ratio Working Papers 98, The Ratio Institute.
    4. Qianwang Deng & Xiahui Liu & Haolan Liao, 2015. "Identifying Critical Factors in the Eco-Efficiency of Remanufacturing Based on the Fuzzy DEMATEL Method," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(11), pages 1-21, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity paradox; ICT; economic development; TFP growth; China;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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